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  1. #1
    hhtt21 is offline Key Member
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    gain acceleration

    I am trying to form a sentence. Would you help me form it?

    "For the last few years, the world of micro processors has gained an incredible/unbelievable acceleration."

    This is intended to be a translation from another source. I am strongly hesitating on the use of words incredible/unbelievable and I do not know whether it is grammar is correct or not.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    hhtt21 is offline Key Member
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    Re: gain acceleration

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertJ View Post
    From my point of view:

    a) I would not use a comma after 'years'.

    b) "acceleration" is not the right word; nor is 'velocity'. I would use 'momentum'.

    "For the last few years the world of microprocessors has gained incredible momentum." Note: "microprocessor" is one word. You don't need "an".
    What you natives think about incredible vs. unbelievable?

    ​Thank you.

  3. #3
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: gain acceleration

    One of my university professors crossed out "incredible" in a paper I wrote (on Lucky's speech in Waiting for Godot), suggesting "surprising" or some other adjective in its place. This little humiliation burned into my memory to such an extent that I've avoided the word in formal writing for over forty years. I suggest you do the same.

    I would also avoid "unbelievable" unless you mean that an assertion is really something that a rational person should not believe.

    This advice does not necessarily apply to a translation. If the original text used a similarly subjective adjective, either of your proposals is OK. They are synonyms. "Incredible" has Latin roots, "unbelievable" is Anglo-Saxon; unlike most such word pairs, the Latin version is not significantly more formal.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. #4
    hhtt21 is offline Key Member
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    Re: gain acceleration

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    One of my university professors crossed out "incredible" in a paper I wrote (on Lucky's speech in Waiting for Godot), suggesting "surprising" or some other adjective in its place. This little humiliation burned into my memory to such an extent that I've avoided the word in formal writing for over forty years. I suggest you do the same.

    I would also avoid "unbelievable" unless you mean that an assertion is really something that a rational person should not believe.

    This advice does not necessarily apply to a translation. If the original text used a similarly subjective adjective, either of your proposals is OK. They are synonyms. "Incredible" has Latin roots, "unbelievable" is Anglo-Saxon; unlike most such word pairs, the Latin version is not significantly more formal.
    If they are synonyms and if you both avoid of them, what would be your word for such a case?

    Thank you.

  5. #5
    hhtt21 is offline Key Member
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    Re: gain acceleration

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertJ View Post
    In my case I see nothing wrong with "considerable". That is also more realistic.
    What do you think about dramatic. It is often used as an adverb as dramatically.

    ​Thank you.

  6. #6
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: gain acceleration

    Quote Originally Posted by hhtt21 View Post
    What do you think about dramatic. It is often used as an adverb as dramatically.
    That works well. It's not really any less subjective than incredible but it interjects a milder version of the author's impression of the matter.

    Since you're writing a translation, how does a bilingual dictionary translate the adjective?
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  7. #7
    hhtt21 is offline Key Member
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    Re: gain acceleration

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    That works well. It's not really any less subjective than incredible but it interjects a milder version of the author's impression of the matter.

    Since you're writing a translation, how does a bilingual dictionary translate the adjective?
    Since I have changed my PC, I have lost my off-line sources. But from google translate 1. unbelievable 2.incredible (this also has literal correspondence of astonishing) 3. fantastic (this also has literal correspondence of wonderful) 4. fabulous (fictional/wonderful) 5. implausible (ridiculous) 6. inconceivable (out of limits of human mind) . And I looked at another source. It includes amazing, extraordinarily.

    ​Thank you.

  8. #8
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: gain acceleration

    Quote Originally Posted by hhtt21 View Post
    Since I have changed my PC, I have lost my off-line sources. But from google translate 1. unbelievable 2.incredible (this also has literal correspondence of astonishing) 3. fantastic (this also has literal correspondence of wonderful) 4. fabulous (fictional/wonderful) 5. implausible (ridiculous) 6. inconceivable (out of limits of human mind) . And I looked at another source. It includes amazing, extraordinarily.
    Is the original text in your native language? If so, does the adjective convey a sense of disbelief when you read it in this context, or does it suggest astonishment or amazement? Answering this question may guide you to an appropriate English translation.
    I am not a teacher.

  9. #9
    hhtt21 is offline Key Member
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    Re: gain acceleration

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Is the original text in your native language? If so, does the adjective convey a sense of disbelief when you read it in this context, or does it suggest astonishment or amazement? Answering this question may guide you to an appropriate English translation.
    Yes, it convey the idea of astonishment/little surprise for who utter or write this sentence. It is not related to beliefs. So I think dramatic/dramatically fit best.

    Thank you.

  10. #10
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    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: gain acceleration

    Quote Originally Posted by hhtt21 View Post
    Yes, it conveys the idea of astonishment/little surprise for the person who utters or writes this sentence. It is not related to beliefs. So I think "dramatic/dramatically" fits best.
    See above. A few of your recent posts have demonstrated a problem with using the third person singular verb ending.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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