Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    AirbusA321 is offline Banned
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Belgium
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    235

    bottom

    Do all these terms mean the same? Which would you use in everyday talk?

    bottom
    bum/bums
    arse
    ass
    butt/buttocks
    caboose
    fanny
    booty
    backside
    tush/toosh
    duff
    posterior
    hiney/heinie
    rear
    behind
    patootie
    chuff
    badonkadonk
    keister/keester
    prat

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    61,334

    Re: bottom

    Quote Originally Posted by AirbusA321 View Post
    Do all these terms mean the same? Which would you use in everyday talk?

    bottom
    bum/bums Only "bum" in BrE.
    arse (BrE)
    ass (AmE)
    butt/buttocks "Butt" is the same as the others but "buttocks" is used more anatomically/formally.
    caboose Not used in BrE
    fanny In BrE this is slang for "vagina"
    booty (I've only heard this in pop songs)
    backside
    tush/toosh but not commonly used in BrE
    duff Not used in BrE
    posterior
    hiney/heinie Not commonly used in BrE
    rear
    behind
    patootie
    chuff
    badonkadonk
    keister/keester
    prat
    I have marked them above according to BrE usage. The ones I have marked with might well be used in other variants.

    Which one I would use in everyday speech would depend on who I was talking to. I would use different terms when talking to my doctor from the ones I would use when talking to my friends.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. #3
    J&K Tutoring Guest

    Re: bottom

    A few notes to add to what emsr2d2 posted:

    1. Your word bums is perhaps a miss-hearing of the AmE buns.
    2. I think you can remove chuff and prat from your list, unless someone can attest to their use in Australian English.
    3. Fanny, duff, patootie, badonkadonk, and keister are synonyms in AmE.
    4. A couple of additions: seat and (a personal favorite) sit-upon.

    Which would you use in everyday talk?

    Hmm... I guess that depends on the situation and the audience! Probably backside is the most benign (it's the term used in the song Hokey Pokey). All the words in your list are fairly harmless, though ass is borderline vulgar.

  4. #4
    bubbha is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    1,085

    Re: bottom

    bottom, posterior, rear, behind, backside, buttocks: these are benign and acceptable in polite, formal company.

    bum, arse: these are chiefly British English, but they are understood and sometimes used by Americans.


    ass: among all these words, this is probably the only "vulgar" word, but even as a vulgar word, it is mild enough to be allowable on prime-time TV. My standard for whether a word is vulgar or not is asking myself "Would I say it in front of my grandmother?" The answer for "ass" is no. Still, I use it in front of friends and other people I know who aren't offended by mild vulgarities. I wouldn't use it at a business meeting with new clients.

    butt: this is about as ordinary as you can get in American English slang for this body part, and it is understood by Brits. I use it casually among friends, relatives, teachers, learners of English, and even bosses. I might avoid it if I were talking to someone who held sway over my future, like a job interviewer, judge, or parole officer.

    caboose: rather old-fashioned slang. Very benign. Something an old lady might say.

    fanny: Old-fashioned and benign. Something an old lady might say. I avoid it because of the confusion it may cause when speakers of British English hear it. In the UK, it means "vagina".

    booty: very popular 70s slang, especially among African-Americans. It has seen a recent revival, with the additional connotation of "sex".

    badonkadonk: more modern slang, chiefly African-American, for a big, curvaceous bottom. Somewhat crude: I wouldn't use it in polite company.

    tush, keister: these are benign slang term that have a Yiddish feel to them. Don't forget "tuchus", which is very Yiddish!

    duff: benign, but I only hear it in set phrases like "Get off your duff."

    hiney/heinie: benign and humorous. Kind of cute-sounding.

    patootie: old-fashioned slang. Benign and humorous, with a feeling of the American South. Often preceded by "sweet". I can imagine a Southern belle saying "You bet your sweet patootie!"

    Never heard "bums", "chuff" or "prat", though "pratfall" means to fall on one's butt.
    NOT A TEACHER. Translator and editor, and I hold a TESOL certificate. Native speaker of American English (West Coast)

  5. #5
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    31,871

    Re: bottom

    Additional note:

    BE bum bag = AE fanny pack



    ...though it's more commonly worn at the front or on the hip.

    Last edited by Rover_KE; 02-Sep-2017 at 08:09.

  6. #6
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    31,871

    Re: bottom

    I probably use a few myself.


    Likewise—I've spent a lot of time in the USA in recent years and use a number of AE expressions here: way to go, good to go, (food) to go, bite me, catty corner, lookit, I'm good etc.

    Back home I also like to call women bus drivers, shopkeepers etc ma'am and teenage girls who serve me in coffee shops and on market stalls miss. None of them has ever batted an eyelid.

  7. #7
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    61,334

    Re: bottom

    **Off-topic*** If you ever come in my shop and call me ma'am, you'll have to worry about the fist-shaped bruise on one of your own eyelids after I clock you one! I don't want people thinking I'm 150 years old (or a member of the waste-of-space royal family!)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. #8
    AirbusA321 is offline Banned
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Belgium
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    235

    Re: bottom

    I thought you're an English teacher at a school or so. Why do you work in a shop?

  9. #9
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    61,334

    Re: bottom

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertJ View Post
    If I come into your shop, emsr2d2, how should I address you to avoid getting a black eye. Following a habit that I picked up from Frank Sinatra, I sometimes address people as "baby", both men and women. Example: During a concert with Grace Kelly at the 'Royal Festival Hall', Sinatra said to the orchestra conductor: "Apres vous. That means 'go, baby'." Would 'baby' be OK with you?
    In all honesty, I don't want/need to be addressed as anything! Just say "Hi" or "Hello" when you arrive and "Thanks" and/or "Bye" when you leave. I think you already know the answer to whether I'd like to be addressed as "baby"! Mind you, if you tried it, at least you'd have matching black eyes afterwards!

    Quote Originally Posted by AirbusA321 View Post
    I thought you're an English teacher at a school or so. Why do you work in a shop?
    Whilst I appreciate Piscean's defence of my privacy, I'm quite happy to answer that question! I have never taught in a school in the UK. I taught at an academy in Spain and I had private students. In the UK, I only have private students and I fit them in around my other job. Sadly, my mortgage provider and all my other financial responsibilities require me to earn more than my private students bring in. I actually don't want to teach at a school in the UK - the curricula are too proscriptive/prescriptive for my liking.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  10. #10
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    31,871

    Re: bottom

    Quote Originally Posted by AirbusA321 View Post
    I thought you're an English teacher at a school or so. Why do you work in a shop?
    Teachers in the UK are not very highly paid, Airbus. Many of them need to supplement their income.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •