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  1. #1
    TheFes is offline Just Joined
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    Usage of "to" between in English

    This thread is about the usage of "to" in sentences like, I will be off on Tuesday to Thursday, or will be out of office from the 1st to the 15th.

    In Dutch we have two phrases "tot" (to) and "tot en met" (to and including)

    My colleagues and I are now a little bit confused on what is exactly the general usage of to in English.
    In my examples above, does it include the last parts (Thursday and the 15th)?
    In other words, if I would say this to a native English speaker, will he expect me back in the office on Thursday or on Friday? And on the 15th or the 16th?

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Usage of "to" between in English

    Or you can say you will be off "through Thursday" or "until Friday" to indicate that Thursday is part of the time off.

  3. #3
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Usage of "to" between in English

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Or you can say you will be off "through Thursday" or "until Friday" to indicate that Thursday is part of the time off.
    We use "through" for an inclusive range of dates in American English. I've learned from our British members that the British variety lacks this handy nuance.
    I am not a teacher.

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