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  1. #1
    hatgray is offline Member
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    Compensates/compensates

    Hi. Are these both right?

    1. The platform compensates the height of the shoe so it becomes comfortable.

    2. The platform compensates for the height of the shoe so it becomes comfortable.

    Do I need to inclued for?

  2. #2
    hatgray is offline Member
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    Re: Compensates/compensates

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    Your sentences mean nothing to me with or without 'for'.
    Platform of the shoe means a thick sole.

    It means the platform makes it easier for the person to walk in heels.

  3. #3
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    Re: Compensates/compensates

    They're 'platform shoes' in English.
    That translates as 'compensated sole' in some other European languages, but in English you can't talk about the platform compensating for the height of the shoe.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 11-Sep-2017 at 22:22. Reason: Fixing typo.
    I am not a teacher

  4. #4
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    Re: Compensates/compensates

    That doesn't make sense.

    This is what I think of when you say a a person has to "walk in heels":

    Click image for larger version. 

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    This is what I think of when you say "thick sole" in relation to shoes:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    These are "platforms" and although they do have heels, the high sole definitely doesn't make it easier to walk!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. #5
    hatgray is offline Member
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    Re: Compensates/compensates

    Regardless, shouldn't we use compensate for?

    Another example:

    Her virtues compensate her faults.

    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/compensate

    With for or without for?


    Thanks

  6. #6
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: Compensates/compensates

    Quote Originally Posted by hatgray View Post
    Regardless, shouldn't we use "compensate for"?

    Another example:

    Her virtues compensate her faults.

    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/compensate

    Should this sentence be with "for" or without "for"?

    Thanks.
    It should be "Her virtues compensate for her faults". I can't find that example sentence in the link you provided though.

    Please note that starting your post with "Regardless" was rather dismissive of the effort I put in to post #5 to try to help you.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. #7
    hatgray is offline Member
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    Re: Compensates/compensates

    That was not my intention. I appreciate your help.

    Attached is the screenshot with the sentence I mentioned.

    Thanks.

  8. #8
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: Compensates/compensates

    Quote Originally Posted by hatgray View Post
    That was not my intention. I appreciate your help.

    Attached is the screenshot with the sentence I mentioned.

    Thanks.
    I'm glad you found it helpful. Remember to click the "Thank" button on any post you appreciate in future.

    There was no screenshot in post #8 unfortunately but don't worry - I went back into the hyperlink and realised that the example sentence was right at the top! I don't know how I missed it.
    I'm honestly not aware of the use of "compensate" (no preposition) to mean "counterbalance". Maybe I've just never stumbled across it or maybe it's just not commonly used in BrE.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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