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  1. #1
    GeneD is offline Senior Member
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    "forget" or "don't remember"

    I don't remember her name.
    I forget her name.


    Is the second sentence okay? If so, are the two interchangeable?

  2. #2
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: "forget" or "don't remember"

    Yes and yes. It's probably more common in American English to say "I can't remember her name," but either of your sentences is correct and natural.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. #3
    Rover_KE is online now Moderator
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    Re: "forget" or "don't remember"

    Also: 'I have forgotten her name'.

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: "forget" or "don't remember"

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    It's probably more common in American English to say "I can't remember her name,"
    It's a common way of saying it in BrE too.

  5. #5
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is online now Moderator
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    Re: "forget" or "don't remember"

    My late grandfather (born 1921) always used to say "I forget" instead of "I can't remember". I don't think I hear it much these days.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. #6
    GeneD is offline Senior Member
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    Re: "forget" or "don't remember"

    I forget her name.
    I've forgotten her name.


    Do the sentences above sound equally natural to the modern-day English speaker? Or is one of them more preferable? Or had I better stick to "can't remember" instead?

  7. #7
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is online now Moderator
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    Re: "forget" or "don't remember"

    I find "I've forgotten her name" and "I can't remember her name" most natural. "I don't remember her name" would be my next preference. I would understand "I forget her name", of course, but it would sound old-fashioned.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 12-Sep-2017 at 18:18. Reason: Fixed typo
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. #8
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: "forget" or "don't remember"

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneD View Post
    I forget her name.
    I've forgotten her name.


    Do the sentences above sound equally natural to the modern-day English speaker? Or is one of them more preferable? Or had I better stick to "can't remember" instead?
    Either one is fine in American English. We're more likely to use the second if forgetting her name is unexpected: ​We had a passionate love affair in college. I can't believe I've forgotten her name!
    I am not a teacher.

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