Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    AirbusA321 is offline Banned
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Belgium
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    235

    get, got, gotten

    I'd like to know if it's possible to talk or write English properly without ever using "get, got, gotten" and replacing them with other words instead.
    Examples:
    I've got good news for you. --> I have good news for you.
    I just got a message from my friend. --> I just received a message from my friend.
    They've gotten into a bad situation. --> They've come into a bad situation.

    It seems to me that it's often possible to replace them but I'm not sure if that's really always the case.

  2. #2
    tedmc is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Malaysia
      • Current Location:
      • Malaysia
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    7,894

    Re: get, got, gotten

    I think "got" is more suited to informal, colloquial English rather than written English.
    "Gotten" is used in American English.
    I would prefer not to use "got" in writing.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    74,101

    Re: get, got, gotten

    The third doesn't really work for me. In most cases, it can be replaced. There may be some expressions where it cannot be replaced, but I can't think of one at the moment. Maybe someone knows an example. However, I can't see much point in trying to do it. This kind of exercise may have intellectual interest, but will probably end up with some strained and odd sentences.

    A French writer wrote an entire novel without using the letter e. This must have been incredibly difficult, but it does how how far you can take things if you really want to.

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    74,101

    Re: get, got, gotten

    When I was at school in the early Middle Ages, they gave us texts with multiple examples of get for homework and ordered us to remove it and replace it. It wasn't much appreciated as a task. If you're using it twenty times in a paragraph, you might want to look for some other words, but it's not an enemy.

  5. #5
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    22,254

    Re: get, got, gotten

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    I think "got" is more suited to informal, colloquial English rather than written English.
    "Gotten" is used in American English.
    I would prefer not to use "got" in writing.
    Got is the simple past form of get. In British English, it is also the past participle. It's more complicated in American English, where gotten is the past participle except when to have got is used as a substitute for to have in the sense of possession.

    Both past participles and the simple past are perfectly fine in formal English. The expression to have got as a substitute for to have is less so.
    I am not a teacher.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •