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  1. #1
    Bassim is offline VIP Member
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    To rain on someone's parade

    I have tried to use "to rain on someone's parade" in my sentence. I am wondering if it makes sense in English.

    Michael was eating a delicious dinner in a restaurant when his ex with her new boyfriend came inside, and they rained on his parade.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: To rain on someone's parade

    Michael was eating a delicious dinner in a restaurant when his ex with and her new boyfriend came inside in; and they ​that really rained on his parade.
    Just eating a delicious meal isn't really enough to warrant the phrase. If he'd been out celebrating a huge event, like his graduation or something similar, it would work. It needs to be more of a special event which is really highly anticipated. The example I gave about the woman really looking forward to a date would be a perfect example for this phrase as well as the "brushfire" one.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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