Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1

    which one is more suitable?

    ex: i haven't been fighting for years
    i haven't fought for years
    which one is better?
    thank you

  2. sheena55ro
    Guest
    #2

    Re: which one is more suitable?

    Quote Originally Posted by endeavor6636
    ex: i haven't been fighting for years
    i haven't fought for years
    which one is better?
    thank you
    I haven`t been fighting since long : you want to put an emphasis on the action -the results are visible but the continuous form does not tell us whether the action is finished or not. Although the person speaking may not be performing the action [fight] at the time of speaking, he may be going to continue it after speaking. The activity is not complete.

    I haven`t fought for years - you put an emphasis on the result.

    There is often very little difference between the present perfect simple and the present perfect continuous. In many cases, both are equally acceptable.

    I've lived here for 10 years and she has been living here for 12 years.
    They've been working here for a long time and Andy has worked here for even longer.
    When we want to emphasize the action, we use the continuous form.

    I've been working really hard lately.
    She's been having a hard time.
    When we want to emphasize the result of the action, we use the simple form.

    I've phoned 32 people today.
    She's written a 64 page report.
    Look at these examples to see the contrast.

    I've been driving for 5 hours and I've driven 500 miles.
    She's been speaking on the phone for 20 minutes and she's not managed to convince him yet.
    We've been talking about this for months and we still haven't found a solution.
    If an action is finished and you can see the results, use the continuous form.

    Your eyes are red. You've been crying.
    You're out of breath. Have you been running?

    I hope it helps,

  3. #3

    Re: which one is more suitable?

    thank you very much, it does help! i think i have understood the concept

  4. AlainK
    Guest
    #4

    Re: which one is more suitable?

    Quote Originally Posted by endeavor6636
    ex: i haven't been fighting for years
    i haven't fought for years
    which one is better?
    thank you
    I was told last week that the use of the continuous aspect, especially in spoken language, almost always implies an emotional point of view. In this case:
    "I haven't fought for years" would be the statement of a mere fact, whereas "I haven't been fighting for years" would indicate a form of regret, or satisfaction, or whatever sentiment can be carried by the tone or the context.
    I got this answer to a similar question from a professor teaching at a British university, so I tend to believe there is some kind of truth in what she said

    Alain

  5. DavyBCN's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Wales
      • Current Location:
      • Rwanda

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 346
    #5

    Re: which one is more suitable?

    Quote Originally Posted by AlainK
    I was told last week that the use of the continuous aspect, especially in spoken language, almost always implies an emotional point of view. In this case:
    "I haven't fought for years" would be the statement of a mere fact, whereas "I haven't been fighting for years" would indicate a form of regret, or satisfaction, or whatever sentiment can be carried by the tone or the context.
    I got this answer to a similar question from a professor teaching at a British university, so I tend to believe there is some kind of truth in what she said
    Alain
    Hm. Seems a very strange idea, whether in spoken or written language. It has to depend on the verb - "I will be sitting on the beach tomorrow" is an idea which makes me happy, but "I have been swimming every day" is just a statement of fact. "I am writing this reply at the moment" - no regrets but maybe some satisfaction! . I can't see any logic to the emotional point of view comment that you were given.

  6. AlainK
    Guest
    #6

    Re: which one is more suitable?

    Quote Originally Posted by DavyBCN
    Hm. Seems a very strange idea, whether in spoken or written language. It has to depend on the verb - "I will be sitting on the beach tomorrow" is an idea which makes me happy, but "I have been swimming every day" is just a statement of fact. "I am writing this reply at the moment" - no regrets but maybe some satisfaction! . I can't see any logic to the emotional point of view comment that you were given.
    You've got a point there.
    Ah, can you trust anyone these days ?
    Maybe she was only speaking of the present perfect continuous.
    However, it made me think of a slogan I read on a London bus a couple of years ago and it seemed to fit in perfectly with her explanation: "I'm loving it" (advertising this kind of junk food kids everywhere seem to be so fond of...)


    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    #7

    Re: which one is more suitable?

    Hi,
    I think in I'm loving it there's a shift of the meaning which enables love to be in the Progressive - it's synonymous to I'm getting a lot of kick.
    Regards

Similar Threads

  1. What kind of curriculum is suitable for an EFL school?
    By hochengcheng in forum Teaching English
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 20-Jun-2006, 07:27
  2. write a suitable nouns
    By yukimi in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Mar-2006, 14:37
  3. Is that soft suitable for kids?
    By Crocodile in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 30-Jan-2005, 01:32
  4. which is suitable usage?
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Dec-2004, 09:19
  5. Which one is more suitable?
    By Abusaad in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-Nov-2004, 12:22

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •