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  1. #1
    Soseki is offline Junior Member
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    on getting out of the car

    Hello,

    He broke his leg on getting out of the car.
    https://www.englishclub.com/vocabula...ositions/o.htm

    Does on in the sentence mean 25 in the dctionary?

    on prep
    25 WHEN STH HAPPENS
    on doing sth
    What was your reaction on seeing him?
    (Longman Dictionary)

    Thank you

  2. #2
    teechar's Avatar
    teechar is offline Moderator
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    Re: on getting out of the car

    Yes, that's what it means.
    However, I'm more likely to omit it in that sentence.

    He broke his leg, getting out of the car.

  3. #3
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    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: on getting out of the car

    I'd omit "on" too but I wouldn't use a comma. The implied word, for me, between "leg" and "getting" would be "while" or, if somehow getting out of the car were the cause of the break, "by".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. #4
    teechar's Avatar
    teechar is offline Moderator
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    Re: on getting out of the car

    I think the comma is needed.

    We have a participial phrase at the end of a sentence, and that phrase is modifying a word (he) which it (the phrase) does not directly follow.
    https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/627/02/

    Here's another source which states that a non-restrictive participial phrase should be set off with a comma.
    http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/edu...cipial-phrases

    Moreover, consider the following example in which I used that same sentence but changed "broke" to "saw" and "his leg" to "Sam" just to demonstrate a point.

    The sentence then becomes:

    He saw Sam getting out of the car. [Here, it's Sam who is getting out of the car.]
    He saw Sam, getting out of the car. [Here, it's "he" who is getting out of the car.]

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