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  1. #1
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    They don't have eleventh and twelfth class

    St Mary school is up to tenth class only. "They don't have eleventh and twelfth class" or "There aren't tenth and twelfth class".

    Please check my sentences.

  2. #2
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Re: They don't have eleventh and twelfth class

    St Mary school is up to tenth class only. "They don't have eleventh and twelfth class" or "There aren't tenth and twelfth class".

    It's probably "St Mary's".
    "St Mary's school goes up to 10th class only. They don't have an 11th or 12th class."
    Last edited by Raymott; 20-Sep-2017 at 12:35.

  3. #3
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    Re: They don't have eleventh and twelfth class

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    St Mary school is up to tenth class only. "They don't have eleventh and twelfth class" or "There aren't tenth and twelfth class".

    It's probably "St Mary's".
    "St Mary's school goes up to 10th class only. They don't have an11th or 12th class."
    Can we say "The school, Tom studied at went up to eight class only. So, after passing eighth class he changed the school"?

  4. #4
    bubbha is offline Senior Member
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    Re: They don't have eleventh and twelfth class

    It seems to me that you mean "8th grade", "10th grade", etc.

    I would write it like this:

    "St. Mary's School only goes (up) to 10th grade. They don't have 11th or 12th grade."

    "The school Tom studied at only went (up) to 8th grade. So, after finishing 8th grade, he changed schools."
    Last edited by bubbha; 20-Sep-2017 at 11:34.
    NOT A TEACHER. Translator and editor, and I hold a TESOL certificate. Native speaker of American English (West Coast)

  5. #5
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    probus is offline Moderator
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    Re: They don't have eleventh and twelfth class

    To my knowledge, "nth grade" is a pure Americanism, never heard outside of the United States. Here in Canada, we would understand "8th grade" but we would never use it. Instead we would say "grade 8". In India, the word grade is never used to indentify a particularly scool year. They use class or sometimes standard. For example: Dilip is in third standard, or third class.

  6. #6
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    Re: They don't have eleventh and twelfth class

    Neither "grade" nor "standard" is used in the UK. These days, kids are in "Year + number". As far as I can work out, it starts at age 5 in Year 1 and works up from there. So, for example, a child in Year 8 is 13 years old (5 + 8).

    (When I went to school, there were very different ways of expressing it but I've learnt from experience on this forum that it's really not worth trying to explain!)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. #7
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    Re: They don't have eleventh and twelfth class

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Neither "grade" nor "standard" is used in the UK. These days, kids are in "Year + number". As far as I can work out, it starts at age 5 in Year 1 and works up from there. So, for example, a child in Year 8 is 13 years old (5 + 8).

    (When I went to school, there were very different ways of expressing it but I've learnt from experience on this forum that it's really not worth trying to explain!)
    So, you don't use the word "class"? I thought it was British.

  8. #8
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: They don't have eleventh and twelfth class

    Yes, we use the word "class" but it just refers to the group of children to which a child is allocated (or to a group of children studying a specific subject for an hour or so). At my secondary school, there were six classes of 30 children in each year.

    Second year (age 12-13) - 6 classes of 30 (180 kids)
    Third year (age 13-14) - 6 classes of 30 (180 kids)
    Fourth year (age 14-15) - 6 classes of 30 (180 kids)
    Fifth year (age 15-16) - 6 classes of 30 (180 kids)

    So there were 30 kids in each class, 180 kids in each year, and 720 kids at the school in total.

    As far as the other meaning is concerned, we had about five classes a day - 1 before morning break, 2 before lunch and 2 after lunch. Each class lasted about an hour.

    Each morning, each class of 30 met in their "form room" (the individual classroom to which that class was allocated) for about 15 minutes at 8.45am - the teacher took the register (to see who was at school that day) and gave us any important information. At 9am we went to assembly (with all the other kids at the school) for about 25 minutes and then we all went our separate ways to take our individual subject classes from 9.30am. The 29 kids I was with from 8.45am to 9am weren't the same 29 I was with for the rest of the day. We didn't all take the same subjects. In some of my (subject) classes, there were only about 10 students, in others there were up to 40.

    Can you see why I didn't want to start explaining this?!
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 20-Sep-2017 at 20:39.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  9. #9
    bubbha is offline Senior Member
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    Re: They don't have eleventh and twelfth class

    In the US, "class" (in the educational sense) can mean:
    1. A group of students who are taught by an instructor in a subject. ("Jim scored the highest in his class on the final.")
    2. A course. ("Next semester I'm taking a class in nuclear physics.")
    3. All students in a school who will graduate the same year. This is also known as the "graduating class". ("Congratulations, class of 2018!")

    There's a lot of overlap in senses 1 and 2.
    NOT A TEACHER. Translator and editor, and I hold a TESOL certificate. Native speaker of American English (West Coast)

  10. #10
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: They don't have eleventh and twelfth class

    It's also used for a cohort of people becoming members of something at the same time, as in the 2016 class of incoming Congress members.
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