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  1. #1
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    through between somebody's legs

    Can we say "somebody passes through between somebody's legs (I watched it in a video)" or "somebody passes through something between their own legs or somebody elses legs (for example a basket ball player passes a ball through between their legs)"?

    https://www.google.co.in/imgres?imgu...act=mrc&uact=8

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: through between somebody's legs

    You can't use them together, no. Just use "pass something between the legs". The word "pass" already includes the idea of movement and if something is passed between two things, it must, by definition, go through from one side to the other or from top to bottom etc.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. #3
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    Re: through between somebody's legs

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    You can't use them together, no. Just use "pass something between the legs". The word "pass" already includes the idea of movement and if something is passed between two things, it must, by definition, go through from one side to the other or from top to bottom etc.
    Somebody passes between somebody's legs" or "somebody passes something between their own legs or somebody elses legs (for example a basket ball player passes a ball between their legs)

    "John passed by small hole without difficulty" or "John came running and "passed" or "went through" between his friends legs. Are these correct?
    Last edited by tufguy; 23-Sep-2017 at 17:46.

  4. #4
    tzfujimino's Avatar
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    Re: through between somebody's legs

    You've used too many "or"s, tufguy.
    They make your post very confusing (for me at least).

  5. #5
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    Re: through between somebody's legs

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertJ View Post
    I'm afraid that your sentences are not correct, but you do ask some interesting questions.
    What would be the correct form then? I have removed through now.

  6. #6
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: through between somebody's legs

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    a. Somebody passes between somebody's legs"
    or
    ​b. "somebody passes something between their own legs"
    or
    c. "somebody passes something between somebody else's legs" (for example a basket ball player passes a ball between their legs)

    a), b) and c) are possible.


    1. "John passed by small hole without difficulty."
    or
    2. "John came running and passed between his friend's legs."
    or
    3. "John came running and went through between his friend's legs."

    Are these correct?
    Look at my changes above. Your multiple options and multiple (frequently incorrect) uses of quotation marks are making your posts almost impossible to navigate. From now on, please do what I have done above and write a new sentence for each option, and letter or number them so that we can refer to them more easily.

    Sentences 2 and 3 (with my corrections) are OK. Note the use of an apostrophe in both.
    Sentence 1 is incorrect. There is an article missing and I have no idea why anyone wouldn't be able to pass by that hole without difficulty.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. #7
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: through between somebody's legs

    John passed by a small hole without difficulty.

    This is a really strange thing to say though. Do you mean he passed over a small hole?
    I am not a teacher.

  8. #8
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    Re: through between somebody's legs

    A great teaching opportunity has been missed here, in my opinion.

    @tufguy: when an attacking footballer or basketball player succeeds by passing the ball between the opponent's legs, that is called a nutmeg .

    Go to youtube and search for nutmeg. You will be bewitched for hours, I guarantee. Especially by L Messi.
    Last edited by probus; 24-Sep-2017 at 01:41.

  9. #9
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    Re: through between somebody's legs

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    John passed by a small hole without difficulty.

    This is a really strange thing to say though. Do you mean he passed over a small hole?
    No, I meant he was so flexible that he went by a small hole.

    Passed over means he leaped over the hole. Am I correct?

  10. #10
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: through between somebody's legs

    Why would someone need to be flexible to walk past (that's what "pass by" means) a small hole? Where is this hole?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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