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  1. #1
    Ju is offline Key Member
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    Presenter and anchorwoman

    1. She is a news presenter in the TV morning news.

    2. She is a news anchorwoman in the TV morning news.

    Are "Presenter" and "anchorwoman" interchangeable in the above sentences.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Presenter and anchorwoman

    The first news in both sentences is redundant. They'd be better without it.

    Use on, not "in".
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  3. #3
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    Re: Presenter and anchorwoman

    pre‧sent‧er /prɪˈzentə $ -ər/ ●○○ noun [countable]
    British English someone who introduces the different parts of a television or radio show SYN
    Synonym: host American English

    Source: http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/presenter
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  4. #4
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    Re: Presenter and anchorwoman

    In the UK, the presenter is usually in the studio. Reporters are out in the field and present short news items, sometimes with input from the main presenter.

    An anchorman/anchorwoman (not commonly used in the UK) is a person who is in the studio for almost every broadcast. They are seen as the main presenter.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. #5
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    Re: Presenter and anchorwoman

    The American version:
    She anchors the morning news on TV.
    OR
    She is the anchor on the morning news.

    Don't say "news anchorwoman" - that's redundant. You certainly don't need it with "morning news" also in the sentence.
    These days, we'd just say "anchor" without specifying anchorman or anchorwoman, like "committee chair."
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 26-Sep-2017 at 00:49. Reason: Fixed typo
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  6. #6
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    Re: Presenter and anchorwoman

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    In the UK, the presenter is usually in the studio. Reporters are out in the field and present short news items, sometimes with input from the main presenter.

    An anchorman/anchorwoman (not commonly used in the UK) is a person who is in the studio for almost every broadcast. They are seen as the main presenter.
    Exactly. To me, presenter in BrE and anchor in AmE are pretty much synonymous.

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