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  1. #1
    Tija is offline Newbie
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    Lexical Choice

    Hi i wonder if you can help me please, i have been given the following question:

    How many different lexical choices do we have to say that someone loses their job? Select 5 common ones, describe the situations/contexts in which they would be appropriate and give example sentences for each.

    I understand what lexical choices mean but i just don't understand the question.
    Am i the employer telling the employee that he/she will lose their job and i have to write 5 ways that i can tell them, (you're fired, your dismissed, made redundant etc) or am i just the third person discussing the loss of a job of an individual? For Example he was sacked, given the boot, redundancy etc)

    Many Thanks

    Tija

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: Lexical Choice

    Quote Originally Posted by Tija View Post
    Hi. I wonder if you can help me please. I have been given the following question:

    How many different lexical choices do we have to say that someone loses their job? Select 5 common ones, describe the situations/contexts in which they would be appropriate and give example sentences for each.

    I understand what "lexical choices" means but I just don't understand the question.
    Am I, the employer, telling the employee that he/she will lose their job and I have to write 5 ways that I can tell them, ("You're fired", "You're dismissed", "made redundant" etc) or am ​I just the a third person discussing the loss of a job of an individual? For example, "He was sacked/given the boot/redundancy" etc.

    Many thanks.

    Tija Unnecessary. We can see your username at the top of your post.
    Welcome to the forum.

    Where did you find this question?

    Please note my corrections above. You must capitalise the word "I" (first person singular) every time you write it. Please make words/phrases/sentences you are querying stand out in some way. You can enclose them in quotation marks, as I did above, or you could italicise them or put them in bold​.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. #3
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Lexical Choice

    The question is worded to allow you to describe the situation from any perspective you please. Employers sometimes use euphemisms to describe situations that will result in job losses; why do they do that? People who have lost their jobs may choose different words to describe the loss depending on whether or not they chose the change.

    (It was tricky to write that paragraph without using any constructs other than "to lose a job" to describe the situation. I don't want to do your work for you!)
    I am not a teacher.

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