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  1. #1
    GoodTaste is offline Key Member
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    the French patient, Schiff’s,

    Does "the French patient, Schiff’s" mean "the French patient(Schiff’s patient)"?


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    Unfortunately, while the French patient, Schiff’s, and a few others have been “awakened” by some sort of brain stimulation, those individual successes have yet to translate into help for thousands of vegetative or minimally conscious patients.

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  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: the French patient, Schiff’s,

    That's how I would read it. "... the French patient, (who is/was) Schiff's (patient), and a few others ..."
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. #3
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: the French patient, Schiff’s,

    Only context can tell. It could be some French patient (mentioned earlier), some patient of Schiff's, and "a few others."

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