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  1. #1
    monsterjazzlicks's Avatar
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    Question RE: Hung vs. Hanged

    Hi folks,

    I have always thought that when a person has been 'hung' (ie. executed) then the description of such an action would be:

    "He was hung on 19th September, 1911."
    Or,
    "They were both hung on the same day."

    But, it seems that everyone says:

    "He was hanged on 19th September, 1911."
    Or,
    "They were both hanged on the same day."

    To me, 'hanged' has always sounded somewhat wrong?

    Many thanks for any assistance offered.

    Paul
    Last edited by monsterjazzlicks; 02-Oct-2017 at 17:39. Reason: spelling
    Mature student of GCSE English, GCSE Maths, and Level One BSL.

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  2. #2
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    Re: Hung vs. Hanged

    Take a look at the following link, and post back if you need further help on this.

    http://grammarist.com/usage/hanged-hung/

  3. #3
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Hung vs. Hanged

    Back when hanging people to kill them was common, people who had been killed that way were supposedly* referred to as "hanged". Nowadays most people would say "hung", but those of us who are aware of the distinction will say "hanged".

    *(I qualified my statement because I don't know whether this was common usage or not.)
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  4. #4
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    Re: Hung vs. Hanged

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    Take a look at the following link, and post back if you need further help on this.

    http://grammarist.com/usage/hanged-hung/
    Hi Teechar,

    I was not sure how the video link was relevant to my question; but the text (upon scrolling down) was, thanks.

    So, because the subject matter is relating to 'death', hanged is used instead of hung?

    Paul
    Mature student of GCSE English, GCSE Maths, and Level One BSL.

    I am not a teacher.

  5. #5
    monsterjazzlicks's Avatar
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    Question Re: Hung vs. Hanged

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Back when hanging people to kill them was common, people who had been killed that way were supposedly* referred to as "hanged". Nowadays most people would say "hung", but those of us who are aware of the distinction will say "hanged".

    *(I qualified my statement because I don't know whether this was common usage or not.)
    Thanks GoesStation,

    Apart from myself, I have never heard anyone use the term (as in the context described above) 'hung'.

    I need to fathom out the meaning of 'participle' as this is not a term I am familiar with.

    Paul
    Mature student of GCSE English, GCSE Maths, and Level One BSL.

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  6. #6
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    Re: Hung vs. Hanged

    Hi,

    I forgot to mention, my main reason for asking is because I want to include a sentence (in the story I am writing) about a prisoner who hangs himself in his cell (or is found to be hanging).

    Paul
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  7. #7
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Hung vs. Hanged

    Here are two sentences:
    1) John Wilkes Booth was hanged. (He wasn't really; he was shot to death.)
    2) After the court pronounced the sentence, the marshal hanged Booth.

    In sentence 1, hanged is the past participle of the verb "to hang". In sentence 2, it's the simple past form of that verb. When you use the same verb for other uses, its past participle and simple past forms are both hung.
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  8. #8
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Hung vs. Hanged

    Quote Originally Posted by monsterjazzlicks View Post
    I forgot to mention, my main reason for asking is because I want to include a sentence (in the story I am writing) about a prisoner who hangs himself in his cell (or is found to be hanging).
    I'm confident that the vast majority of Anglophones would say he had hung himself and was found to have been hung.
    I am not a teacher.

  9. #9
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    Re: Hung vs. Hanged

    Quote Originally Posted by monsterjazzlicks View Post
    Hi Teechar,
    I was not sure how the video link was relevant to my question; but the text (upon scrolling down) was. Thanks.
    You're welcome, Paul.

    Quote Originally Posted by monsterjazzlicks View Post
    So, because the subject matter is relating/related to 'death', is hanged is used instead of hung?
    Basically, yes. You're welcome to post the sentence you have in mind here, and we can check that for you.

  10. #10
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    Re: Hung vs. Hanged

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    You're welcome to post the sentence you have in mind here, and we can check that for you.
    Cheers.

    I will post the paragraph once I have tuned it as well as I can.

    Paul
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