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  1. #1
    GeneD is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • Belarus
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
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    859

    "fall over" / "fall" / "fall down"

    I'm afraid that he might fall over again and hurt himself.
    She still can't walk properly - she keeps falling over.
    I just touched the vase and it fell over.


    Is it possible to use "fall" or "fall down" instead of "fall over" in these examples? And if so, how natural would it sound?
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

  2. #2
    teechar's Avatar
    teechar is offline Moderator
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      • English Teacher
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      • English
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      • Iraq
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    Feb 2015
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    11,554

    Re: "fall over" / "fall" / "fall down"

    Broadly speaking, "fall over" suggests a fall to the side; whereas "fall down" suggests a vertical drop from some height.

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