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  1. #1
    JACEK1 is offline Key Member
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    blank off a pipe but plate in a hole

    Hello all forum users!

    Now that the autumn has arrived, central heating in our little town was switched on. But a friend of mine was taken aback. He was halfway through repairing his radiators when all of a sudden a jet of water pushed out the pipe ending and sent it flying towards the ceiling. He should have finished reparing it much earlier. What we do in such a case is blank off a pipe or close a pipe or blind a pipe.

    If we deal with an opening, however, and want to fill it what we do is plate it in. I would also be inclined to equip an opening with a blank-off plate instead of plating it in.

    To plate a hole in means to fill it or equip it with a blanking plate.

    Do you agree with my definitions and reasoning?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: blank off a pipe but plate in a hole

    You plug a hole by inserting a plug in it.

    I guess your friend forgot to turn off his house's main steam-supply valve. It's nice that you have a municipal heating system available. Such systems only exist in congested commercial districts of a few cities in the United States. As far as I know, district heating is not available to single-occupancy houses anywhere in the country.
    I am not a teacher.

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