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  1. #1
    Quaentor is offline Newbie
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    What does "as that of" mean?

    As in "as well as that of" as in "as well as that of complex numbers".

  2. #2
    Quaentor is offline Newbie
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    Re: What does "as that of" mean?

    Oh, I'm sorry. Here it is:
    "In order to elucidate it's structure, as well as that of complex numbers."
    It's just that I can tell what it means just by looking at the sentence, but I would rather wanna know what the phrase by itself represents.
    Last edited by Quaentor; 06-Oct-2017 at 11:31.

  3. #3
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: What does "as that of" mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by Quaentor View Post
    Oh, I'm sorry. Here it is:
    "In order to elucidate its structure, as well as that of complex numbers."
    It's just that I can tell what it means just by looking at the sentence, but I would rather wanna want to know what the phrase by itself represents.
    That replaces the structure: "... as well as the structure of complex numbers."

    Although you'll see wanna all over the web, we only use more formal English on the forum. (I don't know about other Anglophones but for some reason I find wanna​ particularly irritating when written by non-native speakers, though it's always grating to me. Please don't do it. )

    Write it's only when the contraction can be replaced by it is or it has.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. #4
    Quaentor is offline Newbie
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    Re: What does "as that of" mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Please don't do it.
    I'm trying. But it's hard to write not in the way I pronounce. And it's not always possible to spot it in my own writing.
    Maybe there's a list of words/phrases that a non-native shouldn't use>
    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Write it's only when the contraction can be replaced by it is or it has.
    Yeah, just mistyped. (the sentence is from a book)

    I'm really sorry for my mistakes, next time I'll check my question/reply careful enough.

  5. #5
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: What does "as that of" mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by Quaentor View Post
    I'm trying. But it's hard to write not in the way I pronounce. And it's not always possible to spot it in my own writing.
    Maybe there's a list of words/phrases that a non-native shouldn't use>
    You can write common contractions like don't, won't, I'm, he'd, etc. Gonna and wanna are phonetic spellings of common pronunciations of going to and want to. These spellings have never been adopted in formal writing except in dialog.

    Wanna seemed to pop up all over the place in the last few years, and I notice it particularly frequently in online writings by non-native speakers. It looks to me like a sign of trying too hard to fit in, though I'm sure it just flows naturally off the fingers of those who use it.

    Regardless of how older American readers may react to seeing them, the real reason not to use wanna and gonna on this forum is that we promote the kind of English you can use in job applications, academic papers, business memos, etc. Those words are in an informal register that's unsuitable in those contexts.
    I am not a teacher.

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