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  1. #1
    tufguy is offline VIP Member
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    to impersonate people from Britain, America, Australia etc over the phone.

    The people from call centers try to impersonate people from Britain, America, Australia etc over the phone.

    Please check my sentence.

  2. #2
    Amelot is offline Newbie
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    Re: to impersonate people from Britain, America, Australia etc over the phone.

    That first "from" is not unusual in informal English to mean "connected with", but in this case it clashes with the next "from", which is literal. "At" is better in any event.

    The abbreviation "etc." always has a period after it, and as a matter of style, it is traditionally set off with commas. But you should avoid it altogether in any ordinary prose, as with any Latin abbreviation. Besides, it strikes the reader as lazy and imprecise. I find it acceptable here, however, because the alternatives seem overly fussy. If you still want it, the sentence should read:

    The people at call centers try to impersonate people from Britain, America, Australia, etc., over the phone.

    -----------------------------
    Not a teacher
    Last edited by teechar; 10-Oct-2017 at 13:47. Reason: added not a teacher

  3. #3
    teechar's Avatar
    teechar is offline Moderator
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    Re: to impersonate people from Britain, America, Australia etc over the phone.

    Hello Amelot, and welcome to the forum.

    Please ensure that you have "not a teacher" in your posts when replying to questions on the forum.

  4. #4
    teechar's Avatar
    teechar is offline Moderator
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    Re: to impersonate people from Britain, America, Australia etc over the phone.

    I would use "sound/speak like" instead of "impersonate" in the above.
    Last edited by teechar; 10-Oct-2017 at 16:44.

  5. #5
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: to impersonate people from Britain, America, Australia etc over the phone.

    In British English, etc needs no full stop (period) unless it ends a sentence.

    Treat it as if you'd written and so on.

  6. #6
    Amelot is offline Newbie
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    Re: to impersonate people from Britain, America, Australia etc over the phone.

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    Hello Amelot, and welcome to the forum.

    Please ensure that you have "not a teacher" in your posts when replying to questions on the forum.
    Right. Thanks for adding it. I forgot. I hope I have a signature soon.

  7. #7
    Amelot is offline Newbie
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    Re: to impersonate people from Britain, America, Australia etc over the phone.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    In British English, etc needs no full stop (period) unless it ends a sentence.

    Treat it as if you'd written and so on.
    Interesting. Do you have documentation for the absent stop? My Oxford Guide to Style (2002) says on page 70 "Print it in lower-case roman with a full point ...." Every one on that page is printed "etc.", too.

    I am not a teacher.

  8. #8
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: to impersonate people from Britain, America, Australia etc over the phone.

    I believe it's a question of style and choice. I don't use a full stop after "etc" any more than I use one after things like "Mr", "Mrs", "Dr". If a publication's or company's style guide requires that full stops be used in abbreviations, contractions and acronyms, it will say so.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  9. #9
    SoothingDave is online now VIP Member
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    Re: to impersonate people from Britain, America, Australia etc over the phone.

    I don't see why you should avoid common Latin abbreviations in ordinary prose. Certainly anyone who can read knows what "etc." means.

    People may confuse their i.e.'s and e.g.'s, and may not know exactly when an et al. is appropriate. But, everyone should know "etc."

  10. #10
    Amelot is offline Newbie
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    Re: to impersonate people from Britain, America, Australia etc over the phone.

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    I don't see why you should avoid common Latin abbreviations in ordinary prose. Certainly anyone who can read knows what "etc." means.

    People may confuse their i.e.'s and e.g.'s, and may not know exactly when an et al. is appropriate. But, everyone should know "etc."
    I recommended that because they are ugly, and there is plain English for them. QED

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