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  1. #1
    newkeenlearner's Avatar
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    seized to support his family

    The sentence was written by my teacher.

    I don't know what the verb "seize" mean here? My teacher said" it means always continues to do something; never stop doing something". But, I couldn't find any equivalent in dictionaries.

    My father has never seized to support his family both emotionally and financially. I m absolutely mad about him.
    Last edited by newkeenlearner; 13-Oct-2017 at 19:12.

  2. #2
    newkeenlearner's Avatar
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    Re: seized to support his family

    Thanks Piscean.
    You are right. I looked up in a dictionary and it means "stop doing something".
    Now, I want to make the sentence sound natural. Do you think your suggestion is good or it is formal for speaking?

    How can I make the sentence sound more natural in English?

  3. #3
    Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    Re: seized to support his family

    Quote Originally Posted by newkeenlearner View Post
    I m absolutely mad about him.
    I think you should be grateful to him if he has never ceased to support ...
    I am not a teacher.

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Re: seized to support his family

    If the original sentence is correct, it could have something similar to the last meaning here:
    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dict.../english/seize

    For example:
    I was seized with desire.
    I was seized with enough guilt to support my family.

    It's not a good sentence, but it's the one you've given us. I don't think you can just change the word to something that sounds similar, especially if it then doesn't make sense (as Matthew has shown). Where did your teacher get this sentence? Something doesn't add up.

  5. #5
    newkeenlearner's Avatar
    newkeenlearner is offline Senior Member
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    Re: seized to support his family

    I m absolutely mad about him.
    The sentence above is also written by my teacher.
    Where did your teacher get this sentence? Something doesn't add up.
    I choose some parts of his ideas on "talk about someone you admire most in your life".

    He is an IELTS examiner. The sentence was written by himself. He also published a book on speaking and writing skill for IELTS candidates.

  6. #6
    Tarheel's Avatar
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    Re: seized to support his family

    Say:

    The sentence above was also used by my teacher.

    Also:

    The sentence was written by him.

    "I'm absolutely mad about him" was used in the wrong context. People don't normally say that about their parents. Perhaps:

    Robbie is my boyfriend. I'm absolutely mad about him.
    Last edited by Tarheel; 13-Oct-2017 at 20:37. Reason: Add something.

  7. #7
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: seized to support his family

    Quote Originally Posted by newkeenlearner View Post
    The sentence was written by my teacher.
    <SNIP>
    My father has never seized to support his family both emotionally and financially. I m absolutely mad about him.
    Since the sentence works OK with the near-homonym ceased,​ I would guess that your teacher just wrote the wrong word.
    I am not a teacher.

  8. #8
    newkeenlearner's Avatar
    newkeenlearner is offline Senior Member
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    Re: seized to support his family

    Say:

    The sentence above was also used by my teacher.
    No, I meant the sentence above was also written by him in his book. None of them written by me.

  9. #9
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    Re: seized to support his family

    Quote Originally Posted by newkeenlearner View Post
    The following sentence was written by my teacher:

    My father has never seized the opportunity to support his family both emotionally and financially. I'm absolutely ​really mad about at him.

    I don't know what the verb "seize" means here? My teacher said (space before opening quotation marks) "It means 'always continues to do something; never stop doing something'" (no full stop here) but (no comma here) I couldn't find any equivalent in dictionaries.
    Note my corrections above.

    Your teacher should have written "My father never seized the opportunity to support ..." or "My father never supported ..." to indicate that he did not support his family. He/she should also have included an apostrophe in the contraction "I'm", meaning "I am".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  10. #10
    Tarheel's Avatar
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    Re: seized to support his family

    It's still a very odd sentence in my opinion. Just say:

    My father has never supported his family, either emotionally or financially.

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