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  1. #1
    newkeenlearner's Avatar
    newkeenlearner is offline Senior Member
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    The person I admire most

    My father is my real hero, the person I admire most.

    I can’t understand the bold part. What kind of grammatical structure it has? Why do the writer use “ comma”?

    Is that equivalent to the following?
    My father is my real hero, who is the person I admire most

  2. #2
    Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    Re: The person I admire most

    Quote Originally Posted by newkeenlearner View Post
    My father is my real hero, the person I admire most.

    I can’t understand the bold part.
    The bold part is called an appositive according to http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/appositive.htm
    I am not a teacher.

  3. #3
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: The person I admire most

    Quote Originally Posted by newkeenlearner View Post
    I can’t understand the bold part. What kind of grammatical structure does it have? Why does the writer use a comma?
    See the right way to form a question above. Also note that we use quotation marks to mark quoted words, not for emphasis.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. #4
    Matthew Wai's Avatar
    Matthew Wai is offline VIP Member
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    Re: The person I admire most

    Quote Originally Posted by newkeenlearner View Post
    Is that equivalent to the following?
    My father is my real hero, who is the person I admire most
    I would say 'Does it mean the same as the following?'.
    They mean the same to me.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. #5
    newkeenlearner's Avatar
    newkeenlearner is offline Senior Member
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    Re: The person I admire most

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    The bold part is called an appositive according to http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/appositive.htm
    Thank Matthew.

    According to the link you mentioned, "An appositive is a noun or noun phrase that renames another noun right beside it."
    But in my sentence, "an appositive" doesn't renames another noun right beside it.

  6. #6
    newkeenlearner's Avatar
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    Re: The person I admire most

    I suppose, the following makes better sense. What are your ideas?

    My father, the person I admire most, is my real hero.

    The person I admire most, my father is my real hero.

  7. #7
    tedmc is online now VIP Member
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    Re: The person I admire most

    I think it doesn't "rename"(gives a new name) the noun as such, but provides more information on the noun.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  8. #8
    tedmc is online now VIP Member
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    Re: The person I admire most

    Quote Originally Posted by newkeenlearner View Post
    I suppose (no comma) the following makes better sense. What are your ideas?

    My father, the person I admire most, is my real hero.

    The person I admire most, my father, is my real hero.
    .
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  9. #9
    Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    Re: The person I admire most

    Quote Originally Posted by newkeenlearner View Post
    But in my sentence, "an appositive" doesn't renames another right beside it.
    In your sentence, 'the person I admire most' is right beside 'my real hero', where 'hero' is a noun.
    I am not a teacher.

  10. #10
    Hunia is offline Junior Member
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    Re: The person I admire most

    You are using a relative clause with reference to the head noun, "father". My own research into Chinese grammar (relative clauses do not exist there) has shown that relative clauses semantically work like attributive adjectives or modifying structures in general - at least in Chinese. Semantically, it is most likely the same for English.
    Last edited by Hunia; 17-Oct-2017 at 07:24.

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