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  1. #1
    jasonlulu_2000 is offline Senior Member
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    from

    In my textbook, there is a sentence " You can be swiftly trained for your new job from using previous skills."

    Is this "from" naturally used here? Should I use "by" instead?

    Thanks for your help!

    Jason

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: from

    "From" is certainly wrong there. "By" doesn't work much better. It doesn't fit with "You can be swiftly trained ...".

    You can be swiftly trained for your new job by someone who already does the job.
    Your training for your new job will be enhanced/quicker if you already have some relevant skills.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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