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  1. #1
    subhajit123 is offline Banned
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    Usage of never

    Hi teachers, "have never heard" or "had never heard": Which one should I use in the sentence?

    "Today, I attended a birthday ceremony. I was there for a few hours. The place was decorated well. There I heard a song that had a very good melody. it is so amazaing that I can not forget the melody of the song. I had never/have never heard that song before."




    And one more question, Suppose my friend asks me "What do you think of the song that they have just finished playing?", can I reply "It is great, I have/had never heard it before."

    If there is anything ungrammatical in my passage, correct them.
    Last edited by subhajit123; 24-Oct-2017 at 22:41.

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    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Usage of never

    Quote Originally Posted by subhajit123 View Post
    Hi teachers,

    "Have never heard" or "had never heard": Which one should I use in the following sentence?

    "Today, I attended a birthday party. I was there for a few hours. The place was decorated well. I heard a song there that had a very good melody. It was so amazing that I cannot (or can't) forget it. I had never heard that song before."
    And one more question. Suppose my friend asks me, "What do you think of the song that they have just finished playing?" Can I reply, "It's great. I have/had never heard it before"?

    To be strictly grammatical, had is better. But
    In conversation, both are fine and natural mean the same thing.


    If there is anything ungrammatical in my passage, correct it.
    In conversation, most people (Americans, at least) would say "It's," not "It is."

    Anything is a singular noun, so use the singular pronoun, it.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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