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  1. #1
    moseen is offline Member
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    Swim/swimming

    Swim can be a verb and also a noun. Why in the sentence below, has "swim" "ing", because we can use swim as a noun without "ing"?
    My favorite sports are football and swimming.

  2. #2
    Matthew Wai's Avatar
    Matthew Wai is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Swim/swimming

    'Swim' means 'a period of time during which you swim' rather than 'the sport or activity of swimming'. See the definitions below.

    https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionari...english/swim_2
    https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionari...ing?q=swimming
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  3. #3
    PaulMatthews is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Swim/swimming

    Quote Originally Posted by moseen View Post
    Swim can be a verb and also a noun. Why in the sentence below, has "swim" "ing", because we can use swim as a noun without "ing"?
    My favorite sports are football and swimming.
    The noun "swim" that you are referring to can only occur with a determiner like "a" or "my" ("I’m going for a/my swim", but not *"I’m going for swim").

    But the noun "swimming" that is formed by conversion form the verb form "swimming" behaves differently. This noun may require a determiner, as in "The swimming here is very cheap", or it may not, as in your example.

    Sometimes we cannot be certain whether "swimming" is functioning as a noun or a verb.

    For example, "I like swimming" is strictly speaking ambiguous, but the verb is the more salient interpretation ("I like to swim"). However, noun interpretation can be forced by adjectival premodification, as in "occasional swimming".

  4. #4
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Swim/swimming

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulMatthews View Post
    But the noun "swimming" that is formed by conversion from the verb form "swimming" behaves differently.
    ​/
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  5. #5
    moseen is offline Member
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    Re: Swim/swimming

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    ​/
    Can you please correct my question "Swim can be a verb and also a noun. Why in the sentence below, has "swim" "ing", because we can use swim as a noun without "ing"?"?

  6. #6
    Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    Re: Swim/swimming

    'Swim' can be a verb or a noun, so why is 'swimming' used in the sentence below, as we can use 'swim' as a noun?
    I am not a teacher.

  7. #7
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Swim/swimming

    Quote Originally Posted by moseen View Post
    Can you please correct my question? "Swim can be a verb and also a noun. Why does in the sentence below, has use 'swimming' if , because we can use 'swim' as a noun without 'ing'"? "?
    See above. Never write a combination like this: ?"?" It's always wrong.

    Use alternating quotation-mark styles. American publishers start with double quotes, use single quotes within them, and use double quotes again in the rare case they're needed. Some British publishers use this style, while others begin with single quotes.
    I am not a teacher.

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