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  1. #1
    GeneD is offline Senior Member
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    with/about

    In the grammar-book I'm reading, there are lists of adjectives and the prepositions which normally follow them. Here are two of them usage of which I don't quite understand:
    excited/worried/upset/nervous/happy etc. about a situation
    Are you excited about going away next week?
    delighted/pleased/satisfied/happy/disappointed with something you receive, or the result of something
    I was delighted with the present you gave me.

    Is it okay to say "Are you delighted about going away next week?" and vice versa "I was happy with the present you gave me"? Do I understand it right that the two lists of the adjectives are actually interchangeable and what really matters (sorry, I chose a wrong word first) is the underlined part?
    Last edited by GeneD; 04-Nov-2017 at 12:39. Reason: Thanks for the correction, Piscean.
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

  2. #2
    GeneD is offline Senior Member
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    Re: with/about

    It's from "English Grammar in Use" by Raymond Murphy.
    Last edited by GeneD; 06-Nov-2017 at 12:20. Reason: Thanks, emsr2d2, for the correction.
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

  3. #3
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    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Re: with/about

    There's also a difference between using a term for yourself, and asking another person something using the same term. This applies to subjective judgments.
    Teacher: "Your sentences are just fine." Good.
    Student: "Teacher, can you tell me if my sentences are just fine?" Not good.

    The sentence ""Are you delighted about going away next week?" has something of this quality.


  4. #4
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    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: with/about

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneD View Post
    It's from "English Grammar in Use" by Raymond Murphy.
    Remember to capitalise the main words in book titles.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. #5
    GeneD is offline Senior Member
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    Re: with/about

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Remember to capitalise the main words in book titles.
    I, frankly, felt that something was wrong with the title - it looked strange without the capital letters which I thought must serve only some decoration purpose - and it turns out it is wrong! Thanks, emsr2d2. I didn't know that. In Russian, we don't do it.
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: with/about

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneD View Post
    In Russian, we don't do it.
    Do you just capitalise the first letter of the first word?

  7. #7
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: with/about

    Unfortunately for purists and students, you'll see titles of book/films/plays etc all in lower case. They say they do this for 'stylistic reasons', but it shouldn't be copied by those learning to write standard English.


  8. #8
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    Re: with/about

    Please tell me that's not a translated title of "Animal Farm"!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  9. #9
    GeneD is offline Senior Member
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    Re: with/about

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Do you just capitalise the first letter of the first word?
    Yes, only it. Maybe that's because it seems to Russian speakers that quotation marks make a book's or magazine's name noticeable enough (we use only quotation marks for this purpose and never italics).
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

  10. #10
    GeneD is offline Senior Member
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    Re: with/about

    Do I understand it right that the adjectives (in post 1) are listed in the most natural way? It's better to say "He was pleased with the present", but it's not that good with "about", "He was pleased about his new job". Actually, the latter example is taken from the dictionary (https://www.macmillandictionary.com/...ritish/pleased), but dictionaries don't always tell us whether or not a word (or a preposition) is common and more suitable.

    I accidentally used the word "happy" in my example (in post #1) which is present in both lists, and I tried to fit another adjective into the sentence - "I was nervous with the present you gave me". "Nervous" sounds awkward to me, but I'm not sure about the other adjectives from the list for the preposition "about". "I was excited/worried/upset with the present you gave me". Does it sound okay to the native English speaker's ear?
    Last edited by GeneD; 06-Nov-2017 at 13:00.
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

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