Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    jamshidibrahim is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • Kurdish
      • Home Country:
      • Iraq
      • Current Location:
      • Germany
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    5

    comparative of well-educated

    I was asked: what is the comparative of well-educated? My answer was as follows:

    1. well-educated, well-dressed are hyphenated adjectives from the adverb well referring to a participle adjective educated or dressed , should be taken as a unit therefore if you say (better educated) you break the unit. The better alternative would be (more experienced or talented) although I know these words do not necessarily have the same meaning, so it is a compromise. In my opinion there is no hyphenated (better-educated or better-dressed) and they do not sound natural.

    2. There is a common mistake that all adjectives are gradable. In addition, lexical alternatives are not considered as way to make up for this grammar shortage.
    I would appreciate your thoughts on this matter.

  2. #2
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    9,826

    Re: comparative of well-educated

    Quote Originally Posted by jamshidibrahim View Post
    I was asked: what is the comparative of well-educated? My answer was as follows:

    1. well-educated and well-dressed are hyphenated adjectives from the adverb well, referring to a participle adjective like educated or dressed. It should be taken as a unit. Therefore if you say "better educated" you break the unit.Better alternatives would be "more experienced" or "more talented," although I know these words do not necessarily have the same meaning. So it is a compromise. In my opinion there is no hyphenated "better-educated" or "better-dressed," and they do not sound natural.

    2. There is a common mistake that all adjectives are gradable. In addition, lexical alternatives are not considered as way to make up for this grammar shortage.
    I would appreciate your thoughts on this matter.
    "Better-educated" is natural, and it's grammatical for the same reasons as "well-educated."
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    74,120

    Re: comparative of well-educated

    The Guardian used the hyphenated form in an article a few days ago. However, they used exactly the same phrase without the hyphen a few paragraphs later. I guess the jury's out for a definitive answer:

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics...emain-pollster

  4. #4
    jamshidibrahim is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • Kurdish
      • Home Country:
      • Iraq
      • Current Location:
      • Germany
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    5

    Re: comparative of well-educated

    Thanks Richard. This confusion probably is due to the fact that there is no lexicalisation of a hyphenated better-educated.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •