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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    The use of AF in the US.

    I have been watching people broadcasting their videos on Periscope. I have seen many Americans are using "AF" in their broadcast titles. When I started watching their scopes I didn't understand what "AF" meant, but later I learned it meant "As F**k", like "I am high (drunk) af".

    Now, the point here is that when we compare somebody with someone else especially when they are having the same attributes, we use the following structure.

    as+adjective+as

    Steve is as tall as Kevin.
    Emma is as intelligent as Jennifer.


    as+adverb+as

    He runs as fast as I do.
    She speaks French as fluently as Anna does.

    (The point of confusion)

    Now why there is a single "as" in AF (As F**k)? It should have been something like "as .... as f**k".

    Like the Americans say, "I am high as f**k", but they don't say, "I am as high as f**k". They drop the first "as".

    (Bellow is my conclusion, please correct me if I am wrong)


    From this construction. I think they are not comparing themselves or someone with someone else, but they are putting more stress on what they are feeling just as they use "as hell" too. Keeping this in mind, I think "as f**k" or "AF" can also be replaced by "as hell", like.

    I'm high as hell". or "I am high as f**k" are interchangeable.

    just as "hell" and "f**k" are interchangeable in the followings constructions too.

    Who the hell is he.
    Who the f**k is he.


    I'm sorry to have used the F word on this forum. But this is how Americans are using it in their scopes (broadcasts) on Periscope. At first I got confused but afterwards I got used to it.

    To end my post for those of you who are not familiar with Periscope and the terminology "scope" they use. Periscope is a cell phone app for live streaming, and "scope" means "broadcast" or "video stream" on Periscope.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 04-Dec-2017 at 16:09. Reason: Asterisked the swear words and removed the unnecessary sign-off

  2. Skrej's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: The use of AF in the US.

    Be advised that many English speakers consider the 'f' word one of the most offensive words there is. I would suggest that you edit your post with some asterisks - a good approach any time you need to refer to offensive words. Simply asterisk out some of the letters, typically the offending vow*l, especially when doing so repeatedly.

    That being said, 'AF' is not standard usage, and is slang, text/chat speak, highly non-standard, and extremely informal. As such, don't look for any rhyme or reason or expect it to comply to standard grammar. It's just slang, and you're wasting your time trying to rationalize it against standard grammar as such.

    It's just another chat acronym or text speak that for some reason has crept into use outside of chat/text. Occasionally people try to use them outside of chat/texting.
    Last edited by Skrej; 03-Dec-2017 at 23:59.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  3. Key Member
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    #3

    Re: The use of AF in the US.

    I would suggest that you edit your post with some asterisks - a good approach any time you need to refer to offensive words.


    I disagree. Especially in a forum such as this one, clarity and specificity should be paramount, and sensitivity has no place when responding in a frank and open way to a valid question. Blanking out letters does not change the word, and any offense taken will not be altered by a few asterisks.

  4. probus's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The use of AF in the US.

    It is an error to think that AF is a comparitive. It is not. F*ck is an absolute. You cannot make a comparison that is better or worse than f*ck.

  5. Moderator
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    #5

    Re: The use of AF in the US.

    Quote Originally Posted by J&K Tutoring View Post
    Especially in a forum such as this one, clarity and specificity should be paramount, and sensitivity has no place when responding in a frank and open way to a valid question. Blanking out letters does not change the word, and any offense taken will not be altered by a few asterisks.
    Nevertheless, profanity violates the forum's rules.
    I am not a teacher.

  6. Senior Member
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    #6

    Re: The use of AF in the US.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Nevertheless, profanity violates the forum's rules.
    I agree, it certainly does. We were never taught those things at school and never read them in any of our course books. But this is the way it is. Such things are being used in conversations by native speakers and when a newbie like me who is passionate about learning new things and almost everything he comes across when he hears a native speaker saying it over and over again, it certainly develops a curiosity in his heart to learn about it. "AF" is the most used word in broadcast titles on Periscope. And people are using it in a very normal way, even if it is non-standard.

  7. Senior Member
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    #7

    Re: The use of AF in the US.

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    It is an error to think that AF is a comparitive. It is not. F*ck is an absolute. You cannot make a comparison that is better or worse than f*ck.
    So, it is just a non-standard way of putting stress on something or making it more emphatic, like
    "I am high af" means "I'm over-drunk", or I'm extremely drunk". and it has nothing to do with comparison and since it's non-standard, no grammar rules apply here.

    Correct me if I'm wrong but this is the conclusion I can make from your post.

  8. Moderator
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    #8

    Re: The use of AF in the US.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aamir Tariq View Post
    So, it is just a non-standard way of putting stress on something or making it more emphatic, like
    "I am high af" means "I'm over-drunk", or I'm extremely drunk". and it has nothing to do with comparison and since it's non-standard, no grammar rules apply here.

    Correct me if I'm wrong but this is the conclusion I can make from your post.
    Slang changes over time. High used to mean "moderately drunk", then shifted in the late sixties to "intoxicated on drugs", which is what I would guess the quoted text means. However, it's possible that alcohol is now one of the intoxicants being high can cover.
    I am not a teacher.

  9. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: The use of AF in the US.

    I have already edited post #1 to add asterisks to the profanity. I started doing it as soon as I saw the contents of the thread, before I had even seen the multiple suggestions that the OP do it.
    I've saved you a job, Aamir.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  10. probus's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: The use of AF in the US.

    The abbreviation AF is very commonly used online, presumably to avoid both profanity and asterisks.

    Every day I see many instances of {adjective} AF. Everyone knows what it means.

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