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  1. Member
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    #1

    Kick out One's Heels

    Dear friends

    Please, look at the passage below. It is by Poe.

    "For a long time he would eat nothing but thistles; but of this idea we soon cured him by insisting upon his eating nothing else. Then he was perpetually kicking out his heels — so —so —"

    Any ideas what the expression "kicking out his heels" could mean. Is it an idiomatic phrase or I should treat it directly?
    2015 is the 100th Anniversary of the Armenian Genocide - the first genocide of the 20th century.

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Kick out One's Heels

    It's an idiom. I've never heard it, so I need to read more of the quote.

    "Kicking UP his heels" means celebrating, having fun, romping around, dancing, partying. But that doesn't fit there.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  3. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Kick out One's Heels

    It seems that "kicking out his heels" might be meant literally, but I can't be certain without additional context.

  4. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #4

    Re: Kick out One's Heels

    In British English, kicking your heels means that you are bored and restless when waiting for something.

  5. Member
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    #5

    Re: Kick out One's Heels

    Here is the larger picture, friends. Perhaps, this will disperse the ambiguity.

    "And then," said a tall man, just opposite, "we had here, not long ago, a person who had taken it into his head
    that he was a donkey — which, allegorically speaking, you will say, was quite true. He was a troublesome patient;
    and we had much ado to keep him within bounds. For a long time he would eat nothing but thistles; but of this idea
    we soon cured him by insisting upon his eating nothing else. Then he was perpetually kicking out his heels — so —
    so —"
    "Mr. De Kock! I will thank you to behave yourself!" here interrupted an old lady, who sat next to the speaker.
    "Please keep your feet to yourself! You have spoiled my brocade! Is it necessary, pray, to illustrate a remark in so
    practical a style? Our friend, here, can surely comprehend you without all this. Upon my word, you are nearly as
    great a donkey as the poor unfortunate imagined himself. Your acting is very natural, as I live."
    2015 is the 100th Anniversary of the Armenian Genocide - the first genocide of the 20th century.

  6. VIP Member
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    #6

    Re: Kick out One's Heels

    This is how a donkey kicks out.

    The person concerned, who had taken it into his head that he was a donkey, was doing something similar, possibly like this.

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