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  1. Member
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    #1

    For the matter of that

    Friends

    Please, provide a synonym for the underlined part. See the passage below. It is Poe again.

    There is no knowing what one eats, thought I to myself, at the tables of these people of the province. I will have
    none of their rabbit au-chát — and, for the matter of that, none of their cat-au-rabbit either.

    The dictionary says it means "as far as that is concerned." But I think it does not fit the context here. Maybe some other word could save the situation—even, at least etc.
    2015 is the 100th Anniversary of the Armenian Genocide - the first genocide of the 20th century.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: For the matter of that

    We'd say "for that matter" in current English. Yes, "as far as that's concerned" does fit. It's not a very meaningful phrase - more of an idiom. It can mean, "And while I'm talking about it, let me add ..." or "To be completely clear about the matter ..."

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: For the matter of that

    The expression "for the matter of that" is old-fashioned English. Today we would say "for that matter."

    We use "for that matter" to broaden what's already been said:

    - I hate turnips. For that matter, I hate all vegetables.
    - I didn't go to school yesterday. For that matter, I didn't do my chores at home, either.
    - I've never been to North America. I haven't been to South America, either, for that matter.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 31-Dec-2017 at 00:16. Reason: Fixed typo
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  4. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #4

    Re: For the matter of that

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    The expression "for the matter of that" is old-fashioned English.
    I have only seen it in older texts- I haven't heard anyone say it.

  5. Newbie
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    • Join Date: Jan 2018
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    #5

    Re: For the matter of that

    Quote Originally Posted by Mher View Post
    Friends

    Please, provide a synonym for the underlined part. See the passage below. It is Poe again.

    There is no knowing what one eats, thought I to myself, at the tables of these people of the province. I will have
    none of their rabbit au-chát — and, for the matter of that, none of their cat-au-rabbit either.

    The dictionary says it means "as far as that is concerned." But I think it does not fit the context here. Maybe some other word could save the situation—even, at least etc.
    I would recommend that you read more on Semantics. It would help you understand the context of meaning when it comes to languages.
    Last edited by Milania; 15-Jan-2018 at 10:21.

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