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  1. Senior Member
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    #11

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    On cold winter mornings, I have quinoa porridge made with hemp milk and rice syrup. (It's delicious, vegan and healthy!)
    I didn't know about hemp milk before you mentioned it, and I naturally got curious about what it was and found that it's made from cannabis! Now I'm even more curious. Does this milk have any mood improving effect on cold winter mornings?
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    No. It's from a low THC, non-psychoactive variety of Cannabis Sativa. There are higher THC varieties of Cannabis Sativa, but most of the 'mood enhancing' cannabis is Cannabis Indica. Look here for a description of THC. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetrahydrocannabinol
    “Every miserable fool who has nothing at all of which he can be proud, adopts as a last resource pride in the nation to which he belongs; he is ready and happy to defend all its faults and follies tooth and nail, thus reimbursing himself for his own inferiority.”

    — Arthur Schopenhauer

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    #13

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    I see the American definition is broader: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/porridge
    We hardly ever use the word in American English.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #14

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneD View Post
    Very interesting, indeed! It looks as if you don't cook this meal. Or do you? And buckwheat porridge (if I can call it that) isn't very common either, right? (By the way, I've found a possible synonym for "buckwheat porridge" ("kasha"). Surprisingly, in Russian, "kasha" refers to "porridge" in its broader sense. )
    Among the small minority of Americans who eat it, kasha is (I think) the usual word for buckwheat porridge.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #15

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneD View Post
    Very interesting, indeed! It looks as if you don't cook this meal. Or do you? And buckwheat porridge (if I can call it that) isn't very common either, right? (By the way, I've found a possible synonym for "buckwheat porridge" ("kasha"). Surprisingly, in Russian, "kasha" refers to "porridge" in its broader sense. )
    You do cook it. You treat the flakes of those other grains in the same way as porridge oats. You put them in a pan with milk and cook them on a low heat until most of the milk has been soaked up and then you eat it hot. Some people add a small amount of cold milk around the island of porridge.

    The alternatives to oats are becoming more popular all the time. It's partly down to the fact that more people are being diagnosed with coeliac disease so they're having to avoid gluten-containing foods. Although oats don't naturally contain gluten, they are particularly susceptible to cross-contamination during the growing process and during processing. Brown rice, buckwheat, quinoa and amaranth are great gluten-free alternatives.

    In the UK, kasha is roasted buckwheat groats.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 09-Jan-2018 at 15:34.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. VIP Member
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    #16

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    You do cook it. You treat the flakes of those other grains in the same way as porridge oats. You put them in a pan with milk and cook them on a low heat until most of the milk has been soaked up and then you eat it hot.
    Good Scots will use water for their porridge and add salt to taste.

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    #17

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    And know very well that oats are a grain, which in England is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people.
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    #18

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    In the US "oatmeal" is made from oats. "Cream of Wheat" is a brand name for semolina used as a hot cereal.

    In the south, there is "grits," made from corn/maize.

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    #19

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    In the south, there is "grits," made from corn/maize.
    Specifically, grits are made from hominy, which is dried corn/maize with the skin removed from the kernels by soaking them in a strong alkali solution. The Mexicans or South Americans who invented it (long before Columbus's voyages) had no way to know this, but this processing also liberates niacin, making hominy much more valuable nutritionally.

    Ground hominy can be mixed with water and shaped into variously-shaped cakes which hold together much better than similar cakes made from whole cornmeal.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #20

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    For the sake of completeness, let's not forget gruel – served to orphans and the destitute in workhouses – for which Oliver Twist famously asked for more.

    gru•el

    n.
    ]

    1. a thin cooked cereal made by boiling meal, esp. oatmeal, in water or milk.
    (Collins)

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