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  1. Moderator
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    #21

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    All he ever got was gruel.
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  2. Senior Member
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    #22

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    And know very well that oats are a grain, which in England is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people.
    I didn't know this old dictionary definition, and, I must confess, it's now challenging the stereotype in me which many other Russophones have after watching "The Hound of the Baskervilles" film. The characters often ate porridge (oatmeal) in the film, maybe too often... Anyway, a myth was born that the English always (or often, at least) have (or had in the past) oatmeal for breakfast. Whether it's a myth or not I don't know, but the mentioned dictionary definition hints it is.

    On the other hand, the fact that the word "porridge" is reserved (by BrE speakers) mostly for oatmeal may suggest that oatmeal was a very important meal in the past. And interestingly, having just looked this word up again in the dictionary, I found the following definition for "porridge": a hotfood made from oatmeal and milk or water, often eaten at breakfast. So maybe it's not a myth. What do you say? What do you think of it?
    Last edited by GeneD; 09-Jan-2018 at 21:12. Reason: Added a link.
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

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    #23

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    It was my standard breakfast in winter when I was growing up in southern England in the 1950s. I rarely have breakfast these days but, when I do, it's often porridge in winter and cold oats in milk with a bit of fruit in summer - a crude muesli. I can't claim that I'm typical; I just don't know.

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    #24

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    The Scots of Jonson's day, I believe, routinely ate oats at meals other than breakfast. They still do, though I have no idea how often, in Scottish delicacies like haggis. It may be that the English had not yet adopted the habit of eating oatmeal for breakfast.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #25

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    Porridge, and its over-processed, sugary, strangely advertised poor cousin, Ready Brek, was and still is a pretty standard breakfast food for many people in the UK.
    Edit: Here's the first Ready Brek advert I remember.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #26

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    I see the American definition is broader: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/porridge
    Yes, but it's one of those words we don't often say, like beverage and constable. To sound more natural here, use words like oatmeal, Cream of Wheat, or hot cereal.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #27

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    I think beverage is a reasonably common word in American English.
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  8. Senior Member
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    #28

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    To sound more natural here, use... hot cereal.
    I could never clearly understand the word "cereal". Is cereal different in any way from muesli? I always thought they are the same.

    And is "hot cereal" an AmE synonym for porridge?
    Last edited by GeneD; 10-Jan-2018 at 20:11.
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

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    #29

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneD View Post
    I could never clearly understand the word "cereal". Is cereal different in any way from muesli? I always thought they are the same.

    And is "hot cereal" an AmE synonym for porridge?
    In American English, cereal (or its longer form, breakfast cereal) means "processed grain products, often consumed at breakfast". Cereal also means grain in general, but this is a largely technical usage that's not part of everyday English. Muesli is a kind of cereal. ("Processed" can range from lightly processed, as in steel-cut oats, to industrial concoctions bearing no resemblance to the grains they're made from.)

    Hot cereal is a subset of breakfast cereals. It includes oatmeal, cream of wheat, and a number of other products.
    I am not a teacher.

  10. Senior Member
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    #30

    Re: oat porridge, buckwheat porridge, semolina porridge

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    "Cream of Wheat" is a brand name for semolina used as a hot cereal.
    Is the word "cream" used in this brand name in this sense?
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

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