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Thread: French words

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    #11

    Re: French words

    What does "DJ view" mean?

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    #12

    Re: French words

    We've definitely discussed it before. I haven't been able to find the thread.

    "DJ view" was a fine example of Piscean's sense of humour. The phrase he meant was "déja vu", which happens to be French. In view of the topic under discussion, he made that French phrase sound as if it was being said by an English speaker with no knowledge of French pronunciation.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #13

    Re: French words

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Piscean's sense of humour.
    I never learn.

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    #14

    Re: French words

    Tough crowd.

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    #15

    Re: French words

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    I never learn.
    Sailor V.

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    #16

    Re: French words

    I choked on my gin on that one, but I expect it will go the way of most of mine.

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    #17

    Re: French words

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    Sailor V.
    For those who are completely lost, jutfrank made a French phrase sound as if it were being said by an English speaker with no knowledge of French pronunciation. The original French expression, C'est la vie', means 'That's life'.

    Which reminds me ....

    No. Time to stop!

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    #18

    Re: French words

    San fairy Ann.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 05-Feb-2018 at 00:08.

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    #19

    Re: French words

    Coming back to your question, I've noticed that in general, British English speakers make less effort to pronounce French words à la française than American English speakers. This is particularly evident in syllabic emphasis, where the British nearly always emphasize the first syllable of two-syllable words, while Americans emphasize the second. Neither is correct in French, which uses syllabic emphasis within sentences but not regularly within words. Nevertheless, the BrE gattoe is, I think, more distant than the AmE gattoe from the original gâteau.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #20

    Re: French words

    Part of this depends, I think, one whether or not we consider a word that was originally French to be English now. In British English, gateau, usually without an accent is now an English word used for a large type of rich cake. No attempt is made to pronounce it as we might think the French do.

    Déjà vu, on the other hand, while understood by most native speakers of English and used by many, is still thought of as a French expression, and some attempt is usually made to pronounce it as we think the French do.

    All three of the words originally asked about, bourbon, croissant, entrepreneur, are now accepted as fully English words The pronunciation of the first has been thoroughly anglicised, except when we may be talking of the French dynasty. The pronunciation of the other two approaches our version of the French pronunciation.

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