Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. suprunp's Avatar
    Senior Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Apr 2011
    • Posts: 666
    #1

    [YouTube] I'm just like used to see me

    [...] change them to my actual glasses. Coz I don't know I'm just like used to see me in these.
    (YouTube; 1:52)

    Would you be so kind as to tell me whether I've heard this bit correctly?

    Thanks.

  2. jutfrank's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 9,535
    #2

    Re: [YouTube] I'm just like used to see me

    "I'm just going to change them to my actual glasses 'cause, I don't know, I'm just like used to seeing me in these."

  3. suprunp's Avatar
    Senior Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Apr 2011
    • Posts: 666
    #3

    Re: [YouTube] I'm just like used to see me

    Thank you jutfrank!

    May I ask you whether you can really hear it or you assume that's the only way she could have said it even if we can't hear it clearly?

    Thanks.

  4. jutfrank's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 9,535
    #4

    Re: [YouTube] I'm just like used to see me

    Yes, I believe I can just about perceive the -ing but it is almost imperceptible. It's probably coming more from the intonation and rhythm of the whole phrase "seeing me in these" (which has a nicely regular DA-ka DA-ka DAA) rather than from the actual individual sounds of the -ing suffix. Without the -ing, the tone phrase would be probably be intonated as DAA DA-ka DAA (with a longer first stress). It's hard to say for sure though, since she's speaking fairly fast.

    Also, you're right that I do know that she definitely would not say see by mistake. That is not the kind of mistake a native would make.
    Last edited by jutfrank; 12-Feb-2018 at 23:06.

  5. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Key Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 4,832
    #5

    Re: [YouTube] I'm just like used to see me

    Quote Originally Posted by suprunp View Post
    [...] change them to my actual glasses. Coz I don't know I'm just like used to see me in these.
    (YouTube; 1:52)

    Would you be so kind as to tell me whether I've heard this bit correctly?

    Thanks.
    You're very close. I'm impressed. It's "seeing," not "see," but you're otherwise exactly right.

    She's using a type of slang we call Valleyspeak, which you can Google.

    Valleyspeak employs the word like in a lot of unorthodox or unlikely contexts. It originated among high school girls in Los Angeles, California, USA, and infected Hollywood, which enabled it's rapid spread throughout the English-speaking world.

    An epidemiologist can explain it better than I ever could.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  6. VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Europe
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 15,469
    #6

    Re: [YouTube] I'm just like used to see me

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    Yes, I believe I can just about perceive the -ing but it is almost imperceptible.
    Except in careful speech the /ɪ/ of /ɪŋ/ can often almost disappear. When the /ŋ/ is followed by another nasal release, such as /n/ or /m/, the /ŋ/ itself is almost absorbed into that following sound.

    Knowing what is being said, native speakers 'hear' the sound even if it is reduced to almost non-existence.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 14-Feb-2018 at 14:06. Reason: Fixed typo

  7. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Key Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 4,832
    #7

    Re: [YouTube] I'm just like used to see me

    Yes, she's talking very quickly. She probably hit the espresso bar early and hard. That's why I was impressed that you caught so much of it.

    By the way, here are some corrections to your transcription:

    . . . change them to my actual glasses. 'Cause, I don't know, I'm just, like, used to seeing me in these.


    Punctuation makes it more coherent.

    Coz means cousin. 'Cause is the contraction of because. Sometimes people use coz informally, but it's not standard English. (Yet.)
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  8. suprunp's Avatar
    Senior Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Apr 2011
    • Posts: 666
    #8

    Re: [YouTube] I'm just like used to see me

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    Coz means cousin. 'Cause is the contraction of because. Sometimes people use coz informally, but it's not standard English. (Yet.)
    Thank you. Yes, indeed; now that I've checked through my dictionaries I can see that for some reason all of them interpret it only as a (rather archaic) contraction of 'cousin' but one - Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English - for them this is already standard English and the only, I assume, valid meaning (because). And purely by chance this was the very dictionary I checked against whilst trying to confirm that 'coz' meant what I thought it meant (because).

  9. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Key Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 4,832
    #9

    Re: [YouTube] I'm just like used to see me

    I've heard from one or two of the British teachers here that Longman isn't a completely reliable reference. As I say, people often use coz to mean because, but I don't think it's been recognized as standard English by most standard reference sources.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  10. Junior Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Oct 2017
    • Posts: 90
    #10

    Re: [YouTube] I'm just like used to see me

    I am going to make an off-topic comment, but after hearing her for about a minute I feel entitled to do so

    Who on earth can put up with this gab for long? I mean she is chattering like a magpie! If only some bird-watchers...

    PS
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    She's using a type of slang we call Valleyspeak, which you can Google.
    Wow, they now coin terms for every unorthodox linguistic usage! Poor old Google...
    Last edited by alexpen; 23-Feb-2018 at 10:37.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •