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    #11

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    Yes.

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    #12

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    I don't think any of those tendencies work in my dialect, except perhaps for number 6.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #13

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    #14

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    The initial consonant in the second word is not affected by the final /t/ in the first.

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    #15

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    It is rather that the first sound is affected by anticipation of the second.

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    #16

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    It is rather that the first sound is affected by anticipation of the second.
    Yes, but interestingly this is not always the case. Let me explain how I hear it:

    There are two ways you could pronounce the single word 'cat':

    1) With a final /t/
    2) With a final glottal stop.

    I don't want to say that one way is more or less correct; suffice to say that both are quite natural across all varieties of English.

    So when pronouncing cat burglar: If you would normally pronounce cat as 1), then some kind of assimilation has taken place. But if you would normally use 2), then no assimilation can be considered as having taken place, in which case the first sound (if you consider the stop as a sound) remains unaffected by the subsequent /b/.

    Whichever way you look at it, the final sound of cat does certainly not become a /p/.

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    #17

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    Actually, for many native speakers, the final sound of 'cat' in 'cat burglar' is not pronounced as /t/. The tongue does not touch the alveolar ridge as it does when we produce /t/. Instead, the lips close in anticipation of the following bilabial /b/ This sound is not exploded, but the lips are in the position for a /p/ sound, as is the tongue. Phoneticians refer to this as 'assimilation'.

    If you normally pronounce the final /t/ of 'cat' as a glottal stop, the lips will normally close in anticipation of the /b/ before the vocal folds close in the production of 'cat burglar'. . Once again, the vocal organs are in the position of a /p/ sound. In that one sound has changed into another as the result of a following sound, this is also assimilation.

  8. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #18

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    Actually, for many native speakers, the final sound of 'cat' in 'cat burglar' is not pronounced as /t/. The tongue does not touch the alveolar ridge as it does when we produce /t/. Instead, the lips close in anticipation of the following bilabial /b/ This sound is not exploded, but the lips are in the position for a /p/ sound, as is the tongue. Phoneticians refer to this as 'assimilation'.

    If you normally pronounce the final /t/ of 'cat' as a glottal stop, the lips will normally close in anticipation of the /b/ before the vocal folds close in the production of 'cat burglar'. . Once again, the vocal organs are in the position of a /p/ sound. In that one sound has changed into another as the result of a following sound, this is also assimilation.
    I agree but what do you mean by "in the position of a /p/ sound"? A /p/ is only a /p/ after it has been exploded. Doesn't it make as much sense to say that it's in the position of a /b/ sound? What are you suggesting is the difference between /p/ and /b/ in regards to the position of the vocal organs?

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    #19

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    I agree but what do you mean by "in the position of a /p/ sound"? A /p/ is only a /p/ after it has been exploded.
    Unexploded sounds are still regarded by phoneticians as sounds. The word 'cat' with an unexploded sound at the end is audibly different from /kæ/ when it is not followed by such a sound.

    Doesn't it make as much sense to say that it's in the position of a /b/ sound? What are you suggesting is the difference between /p/ and /b/ in regards to the position of the vocal organs?
    The lips and tongue are in the same position, but the vocal folds vibrate for /b/; they do not for/p/.

    If you say 'He took the cap' and 'He took the cab' with unexploded consonants at the end, you will probably hear the difference yourself.
    Last edited by Piscean; 05-May-2018 at 21:02. Reason: typo corrected

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    #20

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    There are two ways you could pronounce the single word 'cat':

    1) With a final /t/
    2) With a final glottal stop.

    I don't want to say that one way is more or less correct; suffice to say that both are quite natural across all varieties of English.
    Not in mine. I'd only pronounce the /t/ if I were emphasizing it for some reason.
    I am not a teacher.

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