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    #1

    Question about Assimilation

    Just a quick question about Assimilation.
    If one word ends with a /t/ sound and the other starts with a /m/, /b/ or a /p/ sound, does the assimilated sound become /p/ for all of them?

    Like the examples below:

    - Flight Plan
    - Sit Back
    - Private Property
    - Circuit Board
    - Cat Burglar
    - Private Member
    - Light Music

    Is the middle sound /p/ for all of them or does it change according to the starting sound of the second word? /m/ or /b/?

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    #2

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    When I pronounce those word pairs, I reduce the final /t/ sound to a brief stop, then pronounce the following consonant as I would if it were the first word in a string. In other words, the initial consonant in the second word is not affected by the final /t/ in the first.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    Quote Originally Posted by tarusan View Post
    If one word ends with a /t/ sound and the other starts with a /m/, /b/ or a /p/ sound, does the assimilated sound become /p/ for all of them?
    It may become an unexploded /p/ or a glottal stop in rapid everyday speech.

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    #4

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    So what I understand is that we duplicate the first consonant sound of the second word and simply not voice the /t/ consonant sound?

    Cat Burglar would be /ˈkæ(b) bɜːglə /
    Private Property would be /ˈpraɪvɪ(p) prɒpəti/
    Light music would be /laɪ(m) ˈmjuːzɪk/

    Is this right?

  5. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    Quote Originally Posted by tarusan View Post
    Is the middle sound /p/ for all of them
    No.

    or does it change according to the starting sound of the second word? /m/ or /b/?
    It's rather that it disappears into a stop.

    What you've got here is not reallly assimilation. Assimilation is when a sound changes in order to allow the following sound to flow more fluently from it. In these examples here, the /t/ sound is not changing, but simply being represented by a glottal stop.

    You might argue that the /t/ is being assimilated into a glottal stop but I would say that it makes better sense to say that these are cases of elision of the /t/.
    Last edited by jutfrank; 04-Mar-2018 at 21:27.

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    #6

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    Quote Originally Posted by tarusan View Post
    So what I understand is that we duplicate the first consonant sound of the second word and simply not voice the /t/ consonant sound? Is this right?
    No, there's no duplication. But there's a sustain (keeping the lips together) before the release of the following bilabials.

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    #7

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    Is there a good book or a website that teaches Phonology and Connected Speech in detail with examples? I've found some websites but they are not detailed enough. What sources would you recommend?

    Also another quick question:

    Could you give me examples for
    Complete, Partial, and Intermediate Assimilation?
    Last edited by tarusan; 06-Mar-2018 at 09:33.

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    #8

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    • Partial Assimilation and Total Assimilation
      "[Assimilation] may be partial or total. In the phrase ten bikes, for example, the normal form in colloquial speech would be /tem baiks/, not /ten baiks/, which would sound somewhat 'careful.' In this case, the assimilation has been partial: the /n/ sound has fallen under the influence of the following /b/, and has adopted its bilabiality, becoming /m/. It has not, however, adopted its plosiveness. The phrase /teb baiks/ would be likely only if one had a severe cold! The assimilation is total in ten mice /tem mais/, where the /n/ sound is now identical with the /m/ which influenced it."
      (David Crystal, Dictionary of Linguistics and Phonetics, 6th ed. Blackwell, 2008)

    https://www.thoughtco.com/what-is-as...netics-1689141

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    #9

    Re: Question about Assimilation

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    The assimilation is total in ten mice /tem mais/, where the /n/ sound is now identical with the /m/ which influenced it.
    I think that's what could be considered is happening here with cat burglar, etc.

    For more examples of partial, total and intermediate assimilation, see here:
    https://ell.stackexchange.com/questi...f-assimilation

    For a nice chart showing /t/ pronounced as a glottal stop, see here:
    https://pronuncian.com/assimilation-...-glottal-stop/

    For book recommendations? Well, there's a wealth of good ones out there. I suggest you do a bit of an online shop to find one that best suits your needs.

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    #10
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 05-May-2018 at 11:09.

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