Page 3 of 6 First 1 2 3 4 5 6 Last
Results 21 to 30 of 52
  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 47,291
    #21

    Re: Please help with British English

    Quote Originally Posted by NinjaTurtle View Post
    emsr2d2,

    The sentence "We're going to stay with my parents for the holidays" is not British English?
    I wouldn't use it. It's not impossible but we definitely don't use the generic term "holidays" to refer to the days/weeks surrounding a special occasion like Christmas/Easter as much as AmE does.

    The exception to that might be the six-week summer school holiday. There is no special occasion involved in that, it's just the annual six-week summer break from school. When I was a child, if I were going to stay, for example, with my grandparents for the whole six weeks, I might have said "I'm going to stay with my grandparents for the [summer] holidays".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. YAMATO2201's Avatar
    Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Dec 2016
    • Posts: 497
    #22

    Re: Please help with British English

    Quote Originally Posted by NinjaTurtle View Post
    Did “Where is the WC?” used to be common British English but is not anymore?
    Typo? I'd write "Did ... use to be ...".
    I am not a teacher. I welcome responses from native and non-native English speakers alike.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Europe
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 13,741
    #23

    Re: Please help with British English

    Quote Originally Posted by YAMATO2201 View Post
    Typo? I'd write "Did ... use to be ...".
    Using 'used' with auxiliary DO is logically incorrect, but it is so common as to be acceptable to many people.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 05-Apr-2018 at 07:42.

  4. Newbie
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2018
    • Posts: 34
    #24

    Re: Please help with British English

    emsr2d2,

    How would you say, "We're going to stay with my parents for the holidays" in British English, referring to the week of Christmas and New Years?

    By the way, "the holidays" in America refers to Christmas and New Years, whereas it now seems to me that "the holidays" refers to summer in British English.
    Last edited by NinjaTurtle; 05-Apr-2018 at 17:30.

  5. Newbie
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2018
    • Posts: 34
    #25

    Re: Please help with British English

    YAMATO2201 and Piscean,

    I would say that "used to be..." is correct in American English. Not so in British English?

  6. Newbie
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2018
    • Posts: 34
    #26

    Re: Please help with British English

    Hi everyone!

    Does British English use “holiday” to refer to a regular day off (Sat. and Sun. of every week) or is it "day off" like in American English?

    Referring to the idea of “holiday” as in the American word “vacation”, does British English use the verb phrase “take a holiday” or is it just “go on holiday”?

    -----

    On a side note, my Mainland Chinese students have NO IDEA of the differences between American English and British English, so all of this is coming to them as quite a surprise.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 47,291
    #27

    Re: Please help with British English

    Quote Originally Posted by NinjaTurtle View Post
    emsr2d2,

    How would you say, "We're going to stay with my parents for the holidays" in British English, referring to the week of Christmas and New Years?

    By the way, "the holidays" in America refers to Christmas and New Years, whereas it now seems to me that "the holidays" refers to summer in British English.
    I would say "I'm going to stay with my parents for Christmas" and "I'm going to stay with my parents for New Year". If I needed to specify an actual time period, it would be something like "I'm going to stay with my parents for a few days/for a week over/for Christmas/New Year".
    I'm aware that "the holidays" can mean Christmas and New Year in AmE but it's not used by anyone I know in the UK.

    Quote Originally Posted by NinjaTurtle View Post
    YAMATO2201 and Piscean,

    I would say that "used to be..." is correct in American English. Not so in British English?
    "I used to be happy" is fine (for example). The interrogative, though, is "Did you use to be happy?"

    Quote Originally Posted by NinjaTurtle View Post
    Hi everyone!

    Does British English use “holiday” to refer to a regular day off (Sat. and Sun. of every week) or is it "day off" like in American English?

    Referring to the idea of “holiday” as in the American word “vacation”, does British English use the verb phrase “take a holiday” or is it just “go on holiday”
    No, we definitely don't use "holiday" to mean "day/days off". Don't forget, too, that these days, many people don't get Saturday and/or Sunday off every week. People work all sorts of schedules these days.
    I'd use "go on holiday", not "take a holiday" but some people probably use the latter.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. Newbie
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2018
    • Posts: 34
    #28

    Re: Please help with British English

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    The interrogative, though, is "Did you use to be happy?"
    It's fascinating to learn these differences between British English and American English.

    In addition, thanks for clarifying for me that "take a holiday" and "the holidays" (in winter) are not British English. I have learned it is better to make sure than to tell a Chinese student offhand that they are wrong!

  9. VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 5,671
    #29

    Re: Please help with British English

    Quote Originally Posted by NinjaTurtle View Post
    Hi everyone!

    Does British English use “holiday” to refer to a regular day off (Sat. and Sun. of every week) or is it "day off" like in American English?

    Referring to the idea of “holiday” as in the American word “vacation”, does British English use the verb phrase “take a holiday” or is it just “go on holiday”
    No and no. However ...

    We do sometimes use holiday or days holiday to mean 'days off work'. Working people are legally entitled to a certain number of 'days holiday' a year. These are paid workdays when you don't have to work. But holiday may also refer more generally to unpaid time off from a regular job.

    We use the verb take with this usage. Today, an employee at my workplace was requesting having a day off. I asked her "Would you like to take Monday as holiday?" She responded affirmatively. I then asked "Paid or unpaid?"

  10. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 47,291
    #30

    Re: Please help with British English

    I agree with jutfrank's comments and would add that the entitlement to a certain number of days off work from your job is also called "leave" or "annual leave". In the dialogue jutfrank gave, in both of my long-term full-time jobs, we would have said "Would you like to take Monday off as leave?" or "Would you like to take leave on Monday?"
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 06-Apr-2018 at 22:34. Reason: Fixed typo
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

Page 3 of 6 First 1 2 3 4 5 6 Last

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-Mar-2016, 10:32
  2. [General] Quotation Usage in British English and American English
    By Novita S. Dian in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-Mar-2015, 20:54
  3. American English/British English Pronunciation
    By HanibalII in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 18-Jul-2013, 19:32
  4. American English versus British English and more...
    By tangelatm in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-Aug-2006, 19:21
  5. comper british english and american english
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Mar-2004, 21:26

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •