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    #1

    Smile bus and coach

    Could you tell the difference between "bus" and "coach"?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
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      • United States
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    #2

    Re: bus and coach

    In the US, I have only heard coach refer to a horse-drawn conveyance or a railroad car without sleeping accommodations. I have, in other English-speaking countries, heard small busses referred to as motor coaches.

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    #3

    Re: bus and coach

    Hello S17

    Broadly speaking, a bus stops frequently to pick up passengers along a short to moderately long route, e.g. a half-mile run between a railway station and a famous tourist attraction, a 5-mile journey to the suburbs of a city, a 30-mile journey between two major cities, etc. You usually pay your fare when you board the bus. Bus journeys are characteristically used for going to school, going to work, etc.

    A coach stops infrequently to pick up passengers along a moderately long to very long route, e.g. a 30-mile journey between two major cities, a 300-mile journey from a city to the coast, a 1000-mile journey across a continent. Usually you book your seat and pay your fare in advance. Coach journeys are characteristically used for going on holiday, commuting long distances, etc.

    The designs of bus and coach correspond to their functions: thus coaches often have toilets, and are designed to travel at high speed on motorways, etc., while buses are designed for frequent stopping, lower speeds, use in heavy traffic, etc.

    (That said, some bus companies use vehicles that most people would classify as coaches.)

    These descriptions only apply to British buses and coaches. American members (and some British ones) may have a different point of view!

    All the best,

    MrP

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    #4

    Re: bus and coach

    Thank you very much for this detailed explanation. It is of great help to me!!!
    One more question? Can you give a synonym to the phrase "that said"?

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    #5

    Re: bus and coach

    You're welcome!

    Yes, "that said" = "despite what has just been said"; or simply "however", in this context.

    Have a good weekend,

    MrP

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