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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    Fortunately (for us), these documents have been preserved.

    a. Fortunately, these documents have been preserved.
    b. Fortunately for us, these documents have been preserved.

    http://learnersdictionary.com/definition/Fortunately
    ---------------------
    I know that Fortunately is a sentence adverb, so in (a) Fortunately modifies these documents have been preserved. But how about in (b)? Do Fortunately modify for us in (b), and Fortunately for us modify these documents have been preserved?

    Please see below:




    Last edited by kadioguy; 02-May-2018 at 15:32.
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

  2. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Fortunately (for us), these documents have been preserved.

    Yes, I personally think your diagram represents the meaning well.

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    #3

    Re: Fortunately (for us), these documents have been preserved.

    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    a. Fortunately, these documents have been preserved.
    b. Fortunately for us, these documents have been preserved.

    http://learnersdictionary.com/definition/Fortunately
    ---------------------
    I know that Fortunately is a sentence adverb, so in (a) Fortunately modifies these documents have been preserved.
    Although the adverb "fortunately" is a clause-oriented adjunct, it is not a modifier. Elements like this are supplements, not part of clause structure, but loosely attached elements presenting non-integrated content. Supplements do not combine with the clause or some element within it to form a larger constituent, but stand apart as a non-constituent. Supplements do, though, relate to some element within the main clause such as a phrase, or even the whole clause itself, called the 'anchor'. In your example, the semantic anchor is the whole main clause.

    The adverb doesn’t mediate the way in which the proposition relates to truth. In "Fortunately, these documents have been preserved", the proposition that these documents have been preserved is presented as a fact, and the speaker adds an evaluation which amounts to saying "It is fortunate that this is true".


    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    But how about in (b)? Do Fortunately modify for us in (b), and Fortunately for us modify these documents have been preserved?
    The same analysis applies here. The only difference is that "fortunately for us" is an adverb phrase with "fortunately" as head and the PP "for us" as its complement. Functionally, it is just the same as the single word "fortunately", i.e. it is a supplementary evaluative adjunct.

  4. YAMATO2201's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Fortunately (for us), these documents have been preserved.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    Yes, I personally think your diagram represents the meaning well.
    I am flabbergasted at that post. I, for one, think for us modifies Fortunately (but not vice versa).
    I am not a teacher. I am currently studying basic English grammar.

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    #5

    Re: Fortunately (for us), these documents have been preserved.

    Quote Originally Posted by YAMATO2201 View Post
    I am flabbergasted at that post. I, for one, think for us modifies Fortunately (but not vice versa).
    Not quite: in the evaluative adjunct "fortunately for us", the PP "for us" does not modify "fortunately", but functions as its complement. It qualifies as a complement because it has to be licensed (specifically permitted) by the head "fortunately".

  6. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Fortunately (for us), these documents have been preserved.

    Quote Originally Posted by YAMATO2201 View Post
    I am flabbergasted at that post. I, for one, think for us modifies Fortunately (but not vice versa).
    Sorry to flabbergast you.

    I meant that for us tells us something about fortunately—that is, who it was fortunate for, as these documents have been preserved tells us what was fortunate. I didn't mean to suggest that fortunately modifies for us, if that's what you understood.

    Grammar aside, I was really talking about the very basic semantic relations between the parts of the sentence. I was careful not to use any terminology.

  7. YAMATO2201's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Fortunately (for us), these documents have been preserved.

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulMatthews View Post
    Not quite: in the evaluative adjunct "fortunately for us", the PP "for us" does not modify "fortunately", but functions as its complement.
    It is fortunate for us that these documents have been preserved.

    In this sentence, does for us modify fortunate?
    Last edited by YAMATO2201; 08-May-2018 at 11:26.
    I am not a teacher. I am currently studying basic English grammar.

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    #8

    Re: Fortunately (for us), these documents have been preserved.

    Quote Originally Posted by YAMATO2201 View Post
    It is fortunate for us that these documents have been preserved.

    In this sentence, does for us modify fortunate?
    No: "for us" is a complement of "fortunate", not a modifier.

  9. YAMATO2201's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Fortunately (for us), these documents have been preserved.

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulMatthews View Post
    in the evaluative adjunct "fortunately for us", the PP "for us" does not modify "fortunately",
    Please look at the sentence below:

    Luckily for them, he braked in time. (OALD)

    A certain native BrE speaker says "for them" modifies "Luckily". What do you think?
    Last edited by YAMATO2201; 08-May-2018 at 14:13.
    I am not a teacher. I am currently studying basic English grammar.

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    #10

    Re: Fortunately (for us), these documents have been preserved.

    Quote Originally Posted by YAMATO2201 View Post
    A certain native BrE speaker
    Not necessarily the most reliable authority on the termininology of grammar.

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