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    • Join Date: Aug 2006
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    #1

    "to feel"

    Why is it grammatically correct to say "Ifeel bad" rather than "I feel badly"?

  1. Philly's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
    • Posts: 620
    #2

    Re: "to feel"

    .
    Because feel is a linking verb.
    https://www.usingenglish.com/glossary/copula-verb.html
    .


    • Join Date: May 2006
    • Posts: 1,335
    #3

    Re: "to feel"

    Hello, Mary,
    If you say feel badly (though it's a weird collocation) it will change the meaning of feel to explore by touching, eg
    The doctor felt my pulse.
    He felt for a knife in his pocket.
    Regards

  2. Philly's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
    • Posts: 620
    #4

    Re: "to feel"

    Hi Humble
    .
    Just to clarify things a bit (or maybe muddle things further... ):
    .
    Probably most native speakers will understand (and use!) "I feel bad" and "I feel badly" to mean exactly the same thing.
    .

  3. #5

    Re: "to feel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Humble View Post
    Hello, Mary,
    If you say feel badly (though it's a weird collocation) it will change the meaning of feel to explore by touching, eg
    The doctor felt my pulse.
    He felt for a knife in his pocket.
    Regards

    This reminds me of a bumper sticker which read:

    I feel good. Can I feel you?

    It took me a few seconds to understand it.

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    #6

    Re: "to feel"

    There are several English verbs (mostly dealing with the senses) that function as either linking verbs or action verbs depending on the context.

    Some of the most common are: look, feel, smell, appear, and sound.

    You can look in the mirror and decide that you look good.
    You can feel great when you feel that diploma in your hands.
    If my dog smells a skunk and chases it, he'll smell bad for a week.
    When my mother appeared in the doorway suddenly, she appeared angry.

    You can tell if the verb is a linking verb by substituting a form of "to be" in place of the verb and see if the sentence still makes sense.

    ...you [look] are good.
    ...you can [feel] be great...
    ...he'll [smell] be bad for...
    ...she [appeared] was angry.

    If you apply this same test to the action verbs, the sentences won't make sense. You can't be in the mirror, or be that diploma.


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 671
    #7

    Re: "to feel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    Hi Humble
    .
    Just to clarify things a bit (or maybe muddle things further... ):
    .
    Probably most native speakers will understand (and use!) "I feel bad" and "I feel badly" to mean exactly the same thing.
    .
    There is a further confusion here:

    1) "I feel for you" - a la Chaka Khan, " - I think I love you..."

    'Feel' isn't a copula here, so it can take the adverb 'badly', as in "I feel for you badly".

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    #8

    Re: "to feel"

    I hear a lot of African-Americans say "do you feel me?" as a more in-depth check-phrase than "you know?" I really can't classify that as a copula either. It is purely idiomatic.

    Sticking with the musical theme, when Bob Dylan asks, "How does it feel?" and James Brown says, "I feel good," those are copulas.

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