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  1. matilda
    Guest
    #1

    Talking 222-finish?

    Hello all

    What is the best answer for the following test?
    When ……….. the report, you are free to leave.

    A-finished with
    B-finished
    C-have finished

    And another question. Is the first part an appositive?

    Regards

    Matilda


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 3,059
    #2

    Re: 222-finish?

    Quote Originally Posted by matilda View Post
    Hello all
    What is the best answer for the following test?
    When ……….. the report, you are free to leave.
    A-finished with
    B-finished
    C-have finished
    And another question. Is the first part an appositive?
    Regards
    Matilda
    To me, none of them are very natural English, Matilda. For A, my feeling is that you would need <you're>. For B, if you drop 'the report', it would be a natural statement; I think <you're> would be more natural used here too. For C, my feeling is that you would need <you're>.

  2. #3

    Re: 222-finish?

    Absolutely share riverkid"s viwpoint. Something is omitted, exactly you're. These sentences without you're don't make any sense, in my way of thinking.

  3. matilda
    Guest
    #4

    Talking Re: 222-finish?

    note that the first part is a cluse not a complete sentence

  4. Philly's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
    • Posts: 620
    #5

    Re: 222-finish?

    .
    I'd say you can forget C completely. For me, that one is just plain wrong.
    .
    If I had to choose, I'd go for A.
    .
    I agree with riverkid, though. Neither A nor B seems completely natural.
    .


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 671
    #6

    Re: 222-finish?

    Quote Originally Posted by matilda View Post
    Hello all
    What is the best answer for the following test?
    When ……….. the report, you are free to leave.
    A-finished with
    B-finished
    C-have finished
    And another question. Is the first part an appositive?
    Regards
    Matilda
    The first part is an adverbial time clause, not an appositive. It it were an appositive, its antecedent would have to be 'you', as in "You, when finished with the report, are free to leave." An appositive must be able to stand in the place of its antecedent, which would make the sentence "When finished with the report are free to leave." This is clearly ungrammatical, so the clause cannot be an appositive.

    As to A, B or C, I agree with the other posters: none of them are good English, and 'you' should not be omitted. As for what the questioner may have intended, I suspect the answer was intended to be C for the following reason:

    First, transpose the clause to form "You are free to leave when..."

    A: "You are free to leave when (you) finished with the report."
    B: "You are free to leave when (you) finished the report."
    C: "You are free to leave when (you) have finished the report."

    C is the correct TENSE (present perfect), although 'you' cannot be omitted. If 'you' is included in C, it is the only correct sentence.

    I think the questioner mistakenly believed that you can always omit the pronoun in an adverbial time clause. In fact, you have to change C to:
    "When YOU have finished the report, you are free to leave."

    In this form, it is the only correct sentence - because the verb it modifies ('to be free') is in the present tense, and so the adverbial clause must be in the present simple or present perfect tense. A and B are in the simple past tense, and so cannot be correct.

  5. #7

    Re: 222-finish?

    Quote Originally Posted by Coffa View Post
    The first part is an adverbial time clause, not an appositive. It it were an appositive, its antecedent would have to be 'you', as in "You, when finished with the report, are free to leave." An appositive must be able to stand in the place of its antecedent, which would make the sentence "When finished with the report are free to leave." This is clearly ungrammatical, so the clause cannot be an appositive.
    As to A, B or C, I agree with the other posters: none of them are good English, and 'you' should not be omitted. As for what the questioner may have intended, I suspect the answer was intended to be C for the following reason:
    First, transpose the clause to form "You are free to leave when..."
    A: "You are free to leave when (you) finished with the report."
    B: "You are free to leave when (you) finished the report."
    C: "You are free to leave when (you) have finished the report."
    C is the correct TENSE (present perfect), although 'you' cannot be omitted. If 'you' is included in C, it is the only correct sentence.
    I think the questioner mistakenly believed that you can always omit the pronoun in an adverbial time clause. In fact, you have to change C to:
    "When YOU have finished the report, you are free to leave."
    In this form, it is the only correct sentence - because the verb it modifies ('to be free') is in the present tense, and so the adverbial clause must be in the present simple or present perfect tense. A and B are in the simple past tense, and so cannot be correct.
    Hi,
    so, what about this:
    having finished the report, you are free to leave.
    Regards


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 671
    #8

    Re: 222-finish?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mutawakil Aldhubaibi View Post
    Hi,
    so, what about this:
    having finished the report, you are free to leave.
    Regards
    You are absolutely correct . I considered pointing out that form, but it raises other questions about past participles, which I thought would just confuse the situation. But it IS another way of writing the sentence.

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