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  1. #1

    Question "shout-out" and "props"

    Hi,

    I came across a sentence (given below, in part) on a website
    giving credits:

    "let us give credit, props, shout-outs and a deep bow where they are due."

    Does "shout-out" mean "hello"? I have heard it on radio shows as well.
    But I don't know what "props" means.

    Here are a couple of places "props" is used on the same site:

    "Thank you, Dr. Harbaugh. And props."

    "Mad props to Stephen Krashen for being a voice of common sense in academia, ..."

    Thank you

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "shout-out" and "props"

    Yes, a "shout-out" is a greeting of recognition, whether it be hello, hey there, or whatever.

    "Props" is short for "propers." It means support or respect. "Mad props" means extreme propers, or lots of support/respect.


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    #3

    Re: "shout-out" and "props"

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    Yes, a "shout-out" is a greeting of recognition, whether it be hello, hey there, or whatever.
    "Props" is short for "propers." It means support or respect. "Mad props" means extreme propers, or lots of support/respect.
    You know, I've never even heard that ('props'), and I thought I was pretty au fait with US slang. I couldn't have even guessed the meaning.

    Thanks Ouisch.

  3. #4

    Smile Re: "shout-out" and "props"

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    Yes, a "shout-out" is a greeting of recognition, whether it be hello, hey there, or whatever.
    "Props" is short for "propers." It means support or respect. "Mad props" means extreme propers, or lots of support/respect.
    Kewl. You are so leet, Ouisch!

    Thanks


    • Join Date: May 2006
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    #5

    Re: "shout-out" and "props"

    Neither of these are proper English, and no serious English teacher should approve of them. I have never heard them/read them. They may be web slang. But if you are interested in promoting proper English you should ignore them. If we go along with slang like this w might as well reduce the spoken language to some kind of mobile 'phone text-speak.


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    #6

    Re: "shout-out" and "props"

    Quote Originally Posted by dOlier View Post
    Neither of these are proper English, and no serious English teacher should approve of them. I have never heard them/read them. They may be web slang. But if you are interested in promoting proper English you should ignore them. If we go along with slang like this w might as well reduce the spoken language to some kind of mobile 'phone text-speak.
    Well, I understand what you say, but I can't agree with it. 'Proper' English is a myth. The history of English in the last thousand or so years is the history of a language of the underclasses oppressed by Latin and French. Not until the reign of Elizabeth the First (latter half of the sixteenth century) was it even legal in England to read the Christian Bible in our native tongue unless you were a member of the upper classes.

    As a result, the popular English of the English people adopted the vocabulary of anyone and everyone. There are influences from Celtic Britain, the Angles, Jutes and Saxons of the medieval German tribes, the French conquerors, the Indians of the British Empire, and now our American cousins. Slang is the lifeblood of any language, and it is very often the cutting edge where the language renews itself, and envigorates the mainstream tongue.

    More importantly, language is our tool. It is our way of communicating. If you 'ignore' the speech of a section of the population, you marginalise your language and will eventually condemn it to extinction. For nothing is surer than that useless language will wither, and useful language will conquer by bloodless coup. We do not need to proscribe it - only to observe it.

  4. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "shout-out" and "props"

    Quote Originally Posted by dOlier View Post
    Neither of these are proper English, and no serious English teacher should approve of them. I have never heard them/read them. They may be web slang. But if you are interested in promoting proper English you should ignore them. If we go along with slang like this w might as well reduce the spoken language to some kind of mobile 'phone text-speak.
    While it's true these words are slang, they are not Web slang and they have become a part of mainstream American conversational English. You'll hear them used by TV and music personalities and see them used in contemporary literature. If English teachers are going to teach words like "ain't", there's nothing wrong with updating students on the latest colloquialisms (as long as the students understand that it is slang, and not usually appropriate in, say, a business setting.)

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