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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Is this metonymy ?

    Please take a look at this samples, are they metonymy or not ? If not, please explain.

    > The red car overtook blue car. (car instead of person) - Somebody in red car overtook blue car.
    > Hammer hit Joe. (tool instead of person) - Kate hit Joe with hammer.

    What are rules, if any that tool can replace person in the sentence, the second sentence seems to be incorrect.
    > Joe smeared the bread with a knife.
    *Knife smeared the bread.

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    #2

    Re: Is this metonymy ?

    The red car overtook the blue car.
    The hammer hit Joe
    .

    The fact that agents (the driver of the red car and the wielder of the hammer) were necessary in order for these situations to occur does not change the facts that the red car did overtake the blue car and the hammer did hit Joe. We have no metonymy in those sentences.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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    #3

    Re: Is this metonymy ?

    What about the last sentence - this with the knife - Is it correct, could be this a metonymy ?

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    #4

    Re: Is this metonymy ?

    Quote Originally Posted by assasalym View Post
    Joe smeared the bread with a knife. .
    I find that sentence unnatural. Do you mean that he buttered the bread?
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 25-Aug-2018 at 07:29. Reason: Fixed typo
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  5. Newbie
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    #5

    Re: Is this metonymy ?

    Yes, and he do this with a knife.

    Will be correct to transform it, so knife will be a subject ? (Knife buttered the bread)

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    #6

    Re: Is this metonymy ?

    No.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

  7. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #7

    Re: Is this metonymy ?

    Quote Originally Posted by assasalym View Post
    could be this a metonymy ?
    How do you understand the concept of metonymy? I don't see the association between the knife and the person.

  8. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Is this metonymy ?

    Check again what metonymy is.

    Here's a good list of different examples: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_metonyms

  9. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #9

    Re: Is this metonymy ?

    The suits cut through the red tape in the White House a couple of days ago.

  10. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Is this metonymy ?

    Quote Originally Posted by assasalym View Post
    Please take a look at this these samples examples. Are they metonymy or not? If not, please explain.

    > The red car overtook the blue car. (car instead of person) - Somebody in a red car overtook a/the blue car.
    > A/The hammer hit Joe. (tool instead of person) - Kate hit Joe with a/the hammer.

    What are the rules, if any, that a tool can replace a person in the sentence? The second sentence seems to be incorrect.
    > Joe smeared the bread with a knife.
    *A/The knife smeared the bread.
    Quote Originally Posted by assasalym View Post
    What about the last sentence - this "with the knife". Is it correct? Could be this a metonymy?
    Quote Originally Posted by assasalym View Post
    Yes, and he does/did this with a knife.

    Will Would it be correct to transform it (no comma here) so that a/the knife will be is a the subject ? (A/The knife buttered the bread.)
    Note my multiple corrections above. You need to work on your use of articles.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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