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    • Join Date: May 2006
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    #1

    "To you" or "for you?"

    In the sentence below, I'd choose "to you" but am not too sure. Any advice for me? (not to me, I suppose.)

    My advice to you (for you) is that you should get the report done as soon as possible.

  1. Fazzu's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "To you" or "for you?"

    I think if you were to use 'for you' here,you should say:
    'My advice for you is to get the report done as soon as possible'.

    Hope I am right.

  2. whitemoon's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "To you" or "for you?"

    Quote Originally Posted by cleung View Post
    In the sentence below, I'd choose "to you" but am not too sure. Any advice for me? (not to me, I suppose.)

    My advice to you (for you) is that you should get the report done as soon as possible.

    I think you had better write:
    "I advise that you should get the report done as soon as possible."
    Have a good day!

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    #4

    Re: "To you" or "for you?"

    Use either. In this sentence, but not necessarily in others, there is no difference between the two.

    "To you" is more common in the dialect I speak, but I wouldn't notice it if someone said "for you."


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
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    #5

    Re: "To you" or "for you?"

    I agree with Mykwyner. In this situation, it wouldn't matter though I'll suggest that 'for' has a slightly more emotive sense; 'for you' often, [always?] entails a benefit. '

    I'll suggest too, that to' is more neutral, more a preposition of direction.

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