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  1. matilda
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    #1

    Talking 228-use OF or not?

    Hello all

    There is a bad struggle between two of the teachers I know, each insisting on his own idea. They wanted me ask their question and inform them.
    One of them says: it is incorrect to say (most of the people are …) or (some of the people are …). He says we have to say (most people are…) or (some people are …) and the other one insists on using both forms and believes that we can use both and using the first examples makes no problem. What do you think?
    Who is right?

    Regards

    Matilda

  2. #2

    Re: 228-use OF or not?

    Hi,

    Based on what I know, the phrases (most of the people are) and (some of the people are) mean that you are referring to certain people. You know exactly whom you are talking about. On the other hand, the (most people are) and (some people are) are uncertain phrases. You are talking about the general.

    Hope this helps.

  3. Fazzu's Avatar
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      • Tamil
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      • India
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      • Singapore

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    #3

    Re: 228-use OF or not?

    Hi Matilda,

    Both could be used.It depends on the how you are structuring a sentence with them.

    E.g Most people are blind.
    Some people are not blind.


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 671
    #4

    Re: 228-use OF or not?

    Quote Originally Posted by matilda View Post
    Hello all
    There is a bad struggle between two of the teachers I know, each insisting on his own idea. They wanted me ask their question and inform them.
    One of them says: it is incorrect to say (most of the people are …) or (some of the people are …). He says we have to say (most people are…) or (some people are …) and the other one insists on using both forms and believes that we can use both and using the first examples makes no problem. What do you think?
    Who is right?
    Regards
    Matilda
    'The other one' is correct .

    Tell the first one to look up the well-known English proverb "You can please some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you can't please all of the people all of the time." Most people would agree that it's true .


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
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    #5

    Re: 228-use OF or not?

    Quote Originally Posted by hlbert03 View Post
    Hi,
    Based on what I know, the phrases (most of the people are) and (some of the people are) mean that you are referring to certain people. You know exactly whom you are talking about. On the other hand, the (most people are) and (some people are) are uncertain phrases. You are talking about the general.
    Hope this helps.
    I'm afraid that's not correct. The following sentences are identical in meaning:

    1) "Most of the people who are smokers will die from cancer."
    2) "Most people who smoke will die from cancer."


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
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    #6

    Re: 228-use OF or not?

    I think both sentences are correct.

    most + of + the + noun

    most + noun

  4. Fazzu's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: 228-use OF or not?

    Hi Rincui,

    First time seeing one from Singapore in this forum.

    Hey Coffa,you didn't comment on my post!Can I consider it as correct?

  5. DavyBCN's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: 228-use OF or not?

    Quote Originally Posted by Coffa View Post
    I'm afraid that's not correct. The following sentences are identical in meaning:
    1) "Most of the people who are smokers will die from cancer."
    2) "Most people who smoke will die from cancer."
    Can I suggest that both you and hlbert are correct, depending on the context? In your example they are identical but :-

    Most people speak Spanish.
    Most of the people speak Spanish.

    In the first I would assume the speaker meant everyone in the world. If the speaker used the second phrase I would assume everyone in a particular group, location, etc, and would probably ask "Which people?"

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