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    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 6
    #1

    save in terms of

    If one will scoff at the study of language, how, save in terms of language, will one scoff?

    My question is: Could a prepositional phrase be another preposition's object?? If the answer is yes, could you give me more examples?



    Thank you teacher!

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: save in terms of

    Where is the prepositional phrase?



    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,814
    #3

    Re: save in terms of

    RONBEE THE POET!

    How are you?


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 6
    #4

    Re: save in terms of

    Finally someone noticed this thread.
    Thank you two guys!

    Which grouping is correct?
    A) save in / terms of language
    B) save /in terms of language

    If B is correct, then
    save is a preposition
    in terms of language is a preposition phrase. Am I right?

    Please parse this sentence for me. A lot of thanks!


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,814
    #5

    Re: save in terms of

    Hi,

    "In terms of language" is the preposition phrase you're looking for.


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 6
    #6

    Re: save in terms of

    Thank you. I know in terms of language is a prep phrase, But save is also a preposition, So my question is still as follows:

    If one will scoff at the study of language, how, save in terms of language, will one scoff?
    My question is: Could a prepositional phrase be another preposition's object?? If the answer is yes, could you give me more examples? ??

    A lot of Thanks


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,814
    #7

    Re: save in terms of

    Get out from behind a desk. (prep+prep)

    As for your question, let's wait for a better explanation. (conj+prep)

    I think it is a structure of prep+prep, but I could be wrong.

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: save in terms of

    Why wait for another answer? Blacknomi's answer is a perfectly good one.

    You are right that "save" is a preposition in that sentence. Also, there is no reason that a preposition can't be followed by a prepositional phrase. (There is nothing special about prepositional phrases. They are simply phrases started by prepositions (in, on, of, etc.).


    You asked for examples of that usage. Here's one:
    Get out from behind that desk!
    (Three prepositions in a row. Let's see you beat that. )

    save




    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 1,814
    #9

    Re: save in terms of

    Thanks for the help, Poet!



    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 6
    #10

    Re: save in terms of

    That's the answer I'd been eagerly seeking.

    Thank you Poet and Blacknomi!


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