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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Idiom using in sentences

    There are a few sentences I've made with English idioms, but not sure if they are correct to use as in the sentences:
    1. It really makes my blood boil.
    2. He's a night owl who loves staying up late.
    3. I was like a bat out of hell this morning to be on time.
    4. You don't have a cat in hell's chance of winning her heart.
    5. The old hairstyle of mine was a skeleton in the closet.
    Can anyone give me some advice please? Thank you.
    Last edited by suelam11; 22-Oct-2018 at 12:31. Reason: Missed punctuation mark

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Idiom using in sentences

    Welcome to the forum.

    None of them is correct because they don't end with a punctuation mark. Please use the "Edit Post" function to add one appropriate punctuation mark to the end of each one, then we will comment.
    Don't forget to put a full stop after "Thank you" as well!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Newbie
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    #3

    Re: Idiom using in sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Welcome to the forum.

    None of them is correct because they don't end with a punctuation mark. Please use the "Edit Post" function to add one appropriate punctuation mark to the end of each one, then we will comment.
    Don't forget to put a full stop after "Thank you" as well!
    Thank you. I've edited the post.

  4. VIP Member
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    #4

    Re: Idiom using in sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by suelam11 View Post
    1. It really makes my blood boil.
    2. He's a night owl who loves staying up late.
    3. I was like a bat out of hell this morning to be on time.
    4. You don't have a cat in hell's chance of winning her heart.
    5. The old hairstyle of mine was a skeleton in the closet.
    Can anyone give me some advice please? Thank you.
    1. A correct sentence, but it does not show us that you have understood the meaning. (You probably have.)
    2. You understand the general meaning. If we talk of someone as a night owl, we don't generally need to say that they (love to) stay up late. Here's an example sentence:
    He is a night owl, so I had no qualms about calling him at 3 a.m.
    3. This would be better with a verb such as ran or drove, rather than was.
    4. Fine.
    5. No. Try again.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Idiom using in sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by suelam11 View Post
    There Here are a few sentences I've made with English idioms, but I'm not sure if they are correct. to use as in the sentences:

    1. It really makes my blood boil.
    2. He's a night owl who loves staying up late. (although I'm not sure it's necessary to use the second part because that's what being a night owl means.)
    3. I was like a bat out of hell this morning to be on time. This doesn't really work. We usually use an action-related verb before the phrase, such as "I drove like a bat out of hell this morning to get to work on time".
    4. You don't have a cat in hell's chance of winning her heart.
    5. The old hairstyle of mine was a skeleton in the closet. A skeleton in the closet is something much more serious (and potentially criminal) than a slightly embarrassing hairstyle.

    Can anyone give me some advice please? Thank you.
    See above.

    Edit: When I started typing my reply at 14:02, there was inexplicably no sign of Piscean's response from 13:47. It only appeared after I hit submit. So I apologise for having spoilt Piscean's comments on 1 and 5. However, as you can see, we appear to agree on all counts.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 22-Oct-2018 at 14:13.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: Idiom using in sentences

    I see you have also posted these sentences on the Word Reference forum.

    Please ask your questions on one forum at a time. Once one forum has dealt with it, then post it to another forum. If you don't, you will simply drive the most engaged responders from your posts, which will have the opposite effect to that intended.
    (Tdol)

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    #7

    Re: Idiom using in sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    I see you have also posted these sentences on the Word Reference forum.

    Please ask your questions on one forum at a time. Once one forum has dealt with it, then post it to another forum. If you don't, you will simply drive the most engaged responders from your posts, which will have the opposite effect to that intended.
    (Tdol)
    Thank you. Shall pay attention to this and avoid doing so in future.

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