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  1. #1

    From or of

    Hi, can you give me a way to explain the difference between from and of? In Dutch, both are translated by "van". I know the difference, but how to expalin it. I had a letter from one of my "students" telling me she was "back of holiday" I see of as belonging to, and from as in leaving from, but is there a better expalnation please?

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    #2
    It's hard to get to a single idea, but I would suggest that 'from' has a connection with movemnt, as seen in 'made of' (no substantial physical change) and 'made from' (changes into something esle). Holiday requires movement, so we use 'from'. If we say 'at the back of' we mean behind (location- it's at the back of the shop) and not moving. Does this help at all?

  2. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    It's hard to get to a single idea, but I would suggest that 'from' has a connection with movemnt, as seen in 'made of' (no substantial physical change) and 'made from' (changes into something esle). Holiday requires movement, so we use 'from'. If we say 'at the back of' we mean behind (location- it's at the back of the shop) and not moving. Does this help at all?
    Sounds very good to me, thankyou. :D

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    #4

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