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  1. #1

    Is this right?

    "The alleged song-titles, in the end, weren't on the album."

    What I am trying to express in this statement is that the song-titles have been stated and have been presumed to be a certain addition to the album; however, the song-titles that were stated have now been changed and none of them was on the album in the end. What I want to know is, is my use of "alleged" permissable in terms of semantics?

  2. Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Is this right?

    .
    Your sentence suggests that the given song titles were not really song titles. How about?--

    In the end, the song titles alleged to be on the album were not there.
    .

  3. #3

    Re: Is this right?

    Hi! :D thanks for your answer!


    When you say "the alleged murderer", you mean the person who has been stated or described to be a murderer; so when I say "the alleged song-titles", one may think that it meant, as you rightly pointed out, that the song-titles were "stated or described to be song-titles"; this would suggest that I am questioning their state of being song-titles, which is obviously not the case - I am questioning the names of the song-titles that had been previously stated, and this is where it gets a bit tricky.

    In the example where you say "the alleged murderer", "alleged" has been used as an adjective. But "alleged" as a verb can mean "stated without proof". If I used "alleged" as a verb in a noun phrase "the kicked ball", "the abused woman", "the alleged song-titles", isn't it acceptable? :)

  4. Philly's Avatar

    • Join Date: Jun 2006
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    #4

    The meaning is wrong

    Hi Passionwagon

    It's not the structure of the sentence that's the main problem; it's the meaning.

    Saying "alleged song-titles" means that someone said that the things on the album were 'song titles', but since there wasn't any proof, it may end up that they're not song titles at all, but rather wads of bubble gum.

    MM's suggestion was perfect if you definitely want to keep the word alleged in the sentence.

    If you want to keep the original structure of the sentence, what about using the word promised instead of alleged:

    "The song titles promised, in the end, weren't on the album."
    .

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    #5

    Re: Is this right?

    Or perhaps:

    1. In the end, the proposed song-titles weren't used on the album.
    2. In the end, the projected song-titles...
    3. In the end, the expected song-titles...

    MrP


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
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    #6

    Re: The meaning is wrong

    Quote Originally Posted by Philly View Post
    Hi Passionwagon

    It's not the structure of the sentence that's the main problem; it's the meaning.

    Saying "alleged song-titles" means that someone said that the things on the album were 'song titles', but since there wasn't any proof, it may end up that they're not song titles at all, but rather wads of bubble gum.

    MM's suggestion was perfect if you definitely want to keep the word alleged in the sentence.

    If you want to keep the original structure of the sentence, what about using the word promised instead of alleged:

    "The song titles promised, in the end, weren't on the album."
    .
    What about "The song titles that were allegedly to be included on the album were not there in the end."

  5. #7

    Re: Is this right?

    Thanks Philly for your explanation! I understand it so much better now - I think it's quite tricky though, because of it's similar meaning to "supposed" - when you say "I supposed he was going to the party" you mean "reckoned" or "guessed"; when you say "the supposed author" you are questioning his or her ownership or talent. You explained it very well.

    Thank you MrPedantic and Coffa for your recommendations as well, I 'll see which one sounds the best in context.

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