Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
    • Posts: 863
    #1

    start (with)

    Well, you can now start with correcting my mistakes.

    And this sentence is quite true at the moment, as I'd like to hear your opinions on whether "with" should or shouldn't be used there :).

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #2

    Re: start (with)

    I believe the pattern is as follows:

    start with + [noun]
    start [verbal noun] by + [verbal noun]

    EX: Clean the house! You can start with the kitchen, and when you get there, you can start [cleaning the kitchen] by washing the floor.

    Hope that stirs up some ideas.

  3. Lenka's Avatar

    • Join Date: May 2004
    • Posts: 863
    #3

    Re: start (with)

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea View Post
    I believe the pattern is as follows:

    start with + [noun]
    start [verbal noun] by + [verbal noun]

    EX: Clean the house! You can start with the kitchen, and when you get there, you can start [cleaning the kitchen] by washing the floor.

    Hope that stirs up some ideas.
    Does it mean that I should have said "You can start by correcting my mistakes." ?
    Or shall I rather say "You can start to correct my mistakes."?


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 671
    #4

    Re: start (with)

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Does it mean that I should have said "You can start by correcting my mistakes." ?
    Or shall I rather say "You can start to correct my mistakes."?
    The first sentence is the one you wanted originally. It implies that your 'start' is the action of correcting mistakes. The second sentence though is simply giving a permission - you CAN start correcting my mistakes if you've nothing better to do with yourself. It's up to you.

    Both 'by' and 'with' are ablative prepositions, but 'by' is used before a verb phrase, whereas 'with' is used before a noun phrase, as Cas was saying.

    "You can start by correcting my mistakes."
    "You can start with the correction of my mistakes,"

    Both of the above are grammatically correct, but the first is more natural.

  4. #5

    Re: start (with)

    Yeah, it would be better to omit the 'with'. Sounds correct as well.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • (Afan) Oromo
      • Home Country:
      • Aaland
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2005
    • Posts: 475
    #6

    Re: start (with)

    Are these the corresponding question forms?
    `
    "How can I start?" for "You can start by correcting my mistakes."
    "What can I start with" for "You can start with the correction of my mistakes."

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #7

    Re: start (with)

    Looks good.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • (Afan) Oromo
      • Home Country:
      • Aaland
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2005
    • Posts: 475
    #8

    Re: start (with)

    Is it completely ungrammatical to use "with + [verbal noun]", or is it still acceptable in some other cases?

  6. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #9

    Re: start (with)

    Well, what's the context? For example, this is grammatical,

    EX: I need help with reading, math, and science.

    'reading' is a verbal noun, right?

    EX: Reading is fun.

    What are your thoughts?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • (Afan) Oromo
      • Home Country:
      • Aaland
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2005
    • Posts: 475
    #10

    Re: start (with)

    Can this phrase be used anywhere else?
    `
    "with correcting the mistakes"

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Get off to a start
    By Lukys in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-Nov-2007, 20:28
  2. (Ver 2) First, firstly, initially, start, beginning
    By Wai_Wai in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Oct-2004, 22:47
  3. "start + to + verb" and " start + present par
    By zeppy in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 14-Dec-2003, 21:37

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •