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  1. Senior Member
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      • Native Language:
      • Russian
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      • Belarus
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    • Join Date: Mar 2017
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    #1

    "Elephant and Pug"

    There is a pretty funny sort of behaviour that, in my opinion, was very well conveyed by I.A. Krylov's fable "Elephant and Pug". I'll post here the only English translation I could find. I'm not sure it's not an amateur's or non-native speaker's translation though. But here it is:

    Along the streets Big Elephant was led,
    To show him off, most likely.
    Since Elephants are not a common thing to see
    A crowd of gapers followed on his heels.
    All of a sudden Pug springs up in front of them.
    And seeing Elephant, it raises a great rumpus,
    It lunges, barks and howls
    And does its best to pick a quarrel.
    "Hey neighbor, stop the fuss,"
    A mutt intones, "You? Deal with Elephant?
    Look at you barking yourself hoarse, and he just strolls
    Nonplussed
    And doesn't care one bit about your noise."
    "Ho ho!" Pug says,"That's just what I enjoy,
    Since I can be a real tough guy
    Without a single blow or bruise.
    That way, the other dogs will say:
    "To bark at Elephant this Pug
    Must be a real strong mug!"


    Are there any funny expressions which could describe a person behaving like a pug in the fable? In Russian, we would most often say that "He/she is Pug" or "He/she is Moska", being 100% sure that the addressee understands that it's the dog from the fable. [In the original Russian text the proper name "Моська" (Moska) is used.] Maybe in English you would also use some fictional character? Or maybe there is some well-known joke? Or just the right word?
    Last edited by GeneD; 14-Dec-2018 at 09:42.
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

  2. kilroy65's Avatar
    Member
    English Teacher
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      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
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      • Bulgaria
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      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Jan 2016
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    #2

    Re: "Elephant and Pug"

    The first word that comes to my mind is "braggadocio".

  3. Senior Member
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      • Russian
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      • Belarus
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    • Join Date: Mar 2017
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    #3

    Re: "Elephant and Pug"

    I think even for those who didn't read Spenser's Faerie Queene the sense of the word should be obvious due to its root. Moreover, 'braggadocio' sounds great! Thanks. I really like it.
    Last edited by GeneD; 16-Dec-2018 at 16:53.
    If it's not too much trouble to you, could you please correct any errors I might have made in this post?

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